New Zealand 11

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BIOGRAPHICAL INFORMATION

AGE: 32

DATE OF BIRTH (DD/MM/YYYY): 1974

PLACE OF BIRTH: Gisborne, New Zealand

GENDER: male

ETHNICITY: Maori

OCCUPATION: teacher

EDUCATION: B.A.

AREA(S) OF RESIDENCE OUTSIDE REPRESENTATIVE REGION FOR LONGER THAN SIX MONTHS:

The subject has also lived in Sydney, Australia. At the time this recording was made, the subject was teaching in Wellington.

OTHER INFLUENCES ON SPEECH: N/A

The text used in our recordings of scripted speech can be found by clicking here.

RECORDED BY: David Nevell

DATE OF RECORDING (DD/MM/YYYY): 2007

PHONETIC TRANSCRIPTION OF SCRIPTED SPEECH: N/A

TRANSCRIBED BY: N/A

DATE OF TRANSCRIPTION (DD/MM/YYYY): N/A

ORTHOGRAPHIC TRANSCRIPTION OF UNSCRIPTED SPEECH:

[Interviewer:  I’m curious.  Is there something that you could say in the Maori language?] [Subject begins to speak in Maori.]  What I’m really passionate about at the moment is my, my family.  Um, we’ve just recently lost my grandmother about a year ago, so, that’s what brought me back into the country from doing “The Lion King.”  From there, um, from, from my grandmother, um she had cancer, so, uh, my grandfather’s still alive, so I came home to look after him.  And, um, and… that was quite, that was quite good.  Just, you know, spending that time with her.  Um, but what I learned was that there are a lot of values that, that my grandfather, and my grandparents, have that, that are missing in a lot of our younger generation or today.  Even within my own little village, my small village.  Whereas before, when we were growing up, something simple, like, uh, my parents would insist that we would eat together, or sometime have dinner together, and that would be an opportunity for us to, kind of, talk with each other and communicate, and I would honestly say now that, um, that even, something as simple as that isn’t being done in my, in my village, where even in Manatuki the world has caught up, and it’s quite fast. And, and our young people in Manatuki aren’t, um, do not spend a lot of quality time with their parents and, and even things like eating together and…  So, um, while we would use that time to talk with, with mum and dad, and, and talk a lot about things, it’s, its very easy for our, our young ones these days just to walk down to the shop and, um, buy them a, you know, pie or something fast, really quick.  Um, but you’d be amazed at how much values, um, that, that simple action of not eating with your parents has an effect on them and, and, and, and, how they communicate, you know, today.  Um, and, and, especially, in, in, in the Maori world is, because communication, um, is, is very important, um, and, and, Maori is an oral language, uh, so you have pro-, protocols on how to speak.  And you have a formal language and an informal language, and, you know…[Interviewer: Yeah, hmm…] Um, and so, the process of, of what you would have went through yesterday, when you came in, um, eh, that, that, as uh, er, uh, uh, predominantly a Maori, what do you call it?  Protocol, or format, where, where you would be, um, officially welcomed, um, and, and all songs or, or, uh, or speeches would be followed by, by a song, and, um, then it would be your turn to talk.  So that, that kind of exchange of, of, of welcome and, you know, and, and response is, is a Maori, a Maori protocol.  Um, yeah.

TRANSCRIBED BY: David Nevell

DATE OF TRANSCRIPTION (DD/MM/YYYY): N/A

PHONETIC TRANSCRIPTION OF UNSCRIPTED SPEECH: N/A

TRANSCRIBED BY: N/A

DATE OF TRANSCRIPTION (DD/MM/YYYY): N/A

SCHOLARLY COMMENTARY: N/A

COMMENTARY BY: N/A

DATE OF COMMENTARY (DD/MM/YYYY): N/A

The archive provides:

  • Recordings of accent/dialect speakers from the region you select.
  • Text of the speakers’ biographical details.
  • Scholarly commentary and analysis in some cases.
  • In most cases, an orthographic transcription of the speakers’ unscripted speech.  In a small number of cases, you will also find a narrow phonetic transcription of the sample (see Phonetic Transcriptions for a complete list).  The recordings average four minutes in length and feature both the reading of one of two standard passages, and some unscripted speech. The two passages are Comma Gets a Cure (currently our standard passage) and The Rainbow Passage (used in our earliest recordings).

 

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