Ontario 36

Both as a courtesy and to comply with copyright law, please remember to credit IDEA for direct or indirect use of samples. IDEA is a free resource; please consider supporting us.



BIOGRAPHICAL INFORMATION

AGE: 61

DATE OF BIRTH (DD/MM/YYYY): 28/11/1954

PLACE OF BIRTH: Windsor, Ontario, Canada

GENDER: female

ETHNICITY: Caucasian

OCCUPATION: accountant (retired)

EDUCATION: university degree

AREA(S) OF RESIDENCE OUTSIDE REPRESENTATIVE REGION FOR LONGER THAN SIX MONTHS:

I have lived in the following places outside of southwestern Ontario, for the periods of time indicated, and in the following order: Bermuda for three years; Victoria, British Columbia,  for three years; Annapolis Valley, Nova Scotia, for 11 years; and northern Alberta for two years. Breaking it down by years: 1954-1973 in Lasalle, Ontario; 1973-1974 in Windsor, Ontario; 1974-1977 in Toronto; 1977-1978 in Windsor; 1978-1981 in Bermuda; 1981-1993 in Windsor; 1993-1996 in Victoria, British Columbia; 1996-2003 in Kingsville, Ontario; 2003-2012 in Annapolis Valley, Nova Scotia; 2012-2012 in Humboldt, Saskatchewan (6 months); 2012-2014 in Fort Vermilion, Alberta; and 2014-present in St. Thomas, Ontario.

OTHER INFLUENCES ON SPEECH: N/A

The text used in our recordings of scripted speech can be found by clicking here.

RECORDED BY: Subject

DATE OF RECORDING (DD/MM/YYYY): 15/11/2016

PHONETIC TRANSCRIPTION OF SCRIPTED SPEECH: N/A

TRANSCRIBED BY: N/A

DATE OF TRANSCRIPTION (DD/MM/YYYY): N/A

ORTHOGRAPHIC TRANSCRIPTION OF UNSCRIPTED SPEECH:

Our family used to take our summer vacations up north, um, in a cottage on Georgian Bay, and living as we did near Windsor and going back to the late 1950s, early 1960s, that was a two-day trip because the wide expressway-style of highways didn’t exist then. They were all two-lane, um, highways and, uh, at least half of the distance was a dirt road. And we would start off, um, packed, uh; the car was a Rambler — it was a Ford Rambler, um, at least for some part of the 1960s, a station wagon, into which we, we put two adults, five children, and, depending on, on any year, it was one or two dogs, em, towing a boat behind us that contained all of the household goods that we would need for a two-month stay up at this cottage. Em, the preparation for the departure was, um, uh, a task which required — I don’t know — two or three days, em, laundry, preparation of food, em, just the whole, the whole, uh, business of transporting a miniature version of, uh, the household, the permanent household, to the cottage where we stayed for about two-and-a-half months.

Em, my father was working in a, in a local factory, so, in Windsor, so he had only about three or four weeks of holiday time, and he would stay with us for a week, go back to, go back home for two or three weeks, tend the garden, which was a large, one-and-a-half acre kitchen garden, em, and then come back up north and spend a week or two. And in the meantime, my mother and, and we children, em, stayed on our own, uh, in this cottage that had no road access, eh, so we were isolated only to the extent that we, um, had no road inland, but, uh, we enjoyed the isolation, swimming for eight to ten hours a day, fishing, um, playing with such friends as we could make around the bay, and when Dad was there, uh, the big event of the, of the day was to go out fishing with him. One of us would, would accompany him out to Georgian Bay, to catch bass — primarily bass — take the fish home, clean them, and that, that would be the next evening’s repast.

TRANSCRIBED BY: Subject

DATE OF TRANSCRIPTION: 15/11/2016

PHONETIC TRANSCRIPTION OF UNSCRIPTED SPEECH: N/A

TRANSCRIBED BY: N/A

DATE OF TRANSCRIPTION (DD/MM/YYYY): N/A

SCHOLARLY COMMENTARY: N/A

COMMENTARY BY: N/A

DATE OF COMMENTARY (DD/MM/YYYY): N/A

The archive provides:

  • Recordings of accent/dialect speakers from the region you select.
  • Text of the speakers’ biographical details.
  • Scholarly commentary and analysis in some cases.
  • In most cases, an orthographic transcription of the speakers’ unscripted speech.  In a small number of cases, you will also find a narrow phonetic transcription of the sample (see Phonetic Transcriptions for a complete list).  The recordings average four minutes in length and feature both the reading of one of two standard passages, and some unscripted speech. The two passages are Comma Gets a Cure (currently our standard passage) and The Rainbow Passage (used in our earliest recordings).

For instructional materials or coaching in the accents and dialects represented here, please go to Other Dialect Services.