Scotland 18

Both as a courtesy and to comply with copyright law, please remember to credit IDEA for direct or indirect use of samples.  IDEA is a free resource;  please consider supporting us.


BIOGRAPHICAL INFORMATION

AGE: 20

DATE OF BIRTH (DD/MM/YYYY): 21/06/1989

PLACE OF BIRTH: Lennoxtown, Glasgow, Scotland

GENDER: male

ETHNICITY: Caucasian

OCCUPATION: student

EDUCATION: When recorded, subject was a university undergraduate.

AREA(S) OF RESIDENCE OUTSIDE REPRESENTATIVE REGION FOR LONGER THAN SIX MONTHS:

Subject moved to Wales to attend school.

OTHER INFLUENCES ON SPEECH:

When recorded, subject was participating in an exchange program allowing him to spend time as a student in Fullerton, California, in the United States.

The text used in our recordings of scripted speech can be found by clicking here.

RECORDED BY: Paul Collins (under supervision of David Nevell)

DATE OF RECORDING (DD/MM/YYYY): 12/10/2009

PHONETIC TRANSCRIPTION OF SCRIPTED SPEECH: N/A

TRANSCRIBED BY: N/A

DATE OF TRANSCRIPTION (DD/MM/YYYY): N/A

ORTHOGRAPHIC TRANSCRIPTION OF UNSCRIPTED SPEECH:

And I was born in Glasgow, eh, by, right outside Glasgow in a small area called Lennoxtown. Eh, I live … there’s mountains all around me and there’s like, just farmers and they, we get our milk from the farmers that live beside us along with our eggs. We only have one shop in Lennoxtown, which is a co-op which sells like your basic cold groceries like bread, cheese, crisps, or whatever you want like from there. And then they have a butcher’s, and then one hairdresser that’s never open. I went to Kilsyth Academy, which is my high school. Places around about me are called like Kilsyth, eh, Kirkintilloch, ehm, Lennoxtown, where I’m from, Cumbernauld, eh, and Glasgow, which is the nearest city to me. My family are all Scottish, like my mom’s Scottish and my Dad’s Scottish. So, I’m like pure Scottish except my granddad was born in Ireland and he came over and married my gran, eh, so, I have a little bit of Irish in me. Eh, I was born and, like, raised with, like, Scottish heritage, like, I celebrate, like, Hogmany, which is the New Year we have. [unclear] … is Scottish so I was brought up with Scottish food, and in Scotland we tend to use like “hegh,” sounds like “loch,” which people say “lock,” and it’s not because it’s “loch”; eh, so we kind of use, use the back of your throat a lot to speak. And we also tend to speak really fast because it’s just, everyone has [unclear] really slow speaking, but back home you’ll probably be speaking that [unclear] at that speed.

TRANSCRIBED BY: Paul Collins (under supervision of David Nevell)

DATE OF TRANSCRIPTION (DD/MM/YYYY): 12/10/2009

PHONETIC TRANSCRIPTION OF UNSCRIPTED SPEECH: N/A

TRANSCRIBED BY: N/A

DATE OF TRANSCRIPTION (DD/MM/YYYY): N/A

SCHOLARLY COMMENTARY: N/A

COMMENTARY BY: N/A

DATE OF COMMENTARY (DD/MM/YYYY): N/A

The archive provides:

  • Recordings of accent/dialect speakers from the region you select.
  • Text of the speakers’ biographical details.
  • Scholarly commentary and analysis in some cases.
  • In most cases, an orthographic transcription of the speakers’ unscripted speech.  In a small number of cases, you will also find a narrow phonetic transcription of the sample (see Phonetic Transcriptions for a complete list).  The recordings average four minutes in length and feature both the reading of one of two standard passages, and some unscripted speech. The two passages are Comma Gets a Cure (currently our standard passage) and The Rainbow Passage (used in our earliest recordings).

 

For instructional materials or coaching in the accents and dialects represented here, please go to Other Dialect Services.