South Africa 27

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BIOGRAPHICAL INFORMATION

AGE: 24

DATE OF BIRTH (DD/MM/YYYY): 1981

PLACE OF BIRTH: Johannesburg

GENDER: male

ETHNICITY: Caucasian

OCCUPATION: student

EDUCATION: Subject was attending college when interviewed.

AREA(S) OF RESIDENCE OUTSIDE REPRESENTATIVE REGION FOR LONGER THAN SIX MONTHS:

Subject was living in Toronto, Canada, at the time of this recording.

OTHER INFLUENCES ON SPEECH: N/A

The text used in our recordings of scripted speech can be found by clicking here.

RECORDED BY: Mark Ingram and his students

DATE OF RECORDING (DD/MM/YYYY): 11/2005

PHONETIC TRANSCRIPTION OF SCRIPTED SPEECH: N/A

TRANSCRIBED BY: N/A

DATE OF TRANSCRIPTION (DD/MM/YYYY): N/A

ORTHOGRAPHIC TRANSCRIPTION OF UNSCRIPTED SPEECH:

It was amazing growing up in Johannesburg.  It was interesting, it was… exciting; it was difficult as well.  I mean … and … you know I, I was there, I was in grade seven in ninety-four, so that was when our first democratic elections happened and, uh, unfortunately you know a lot of the violence started after that and it was difficult, but (um) it was, I mean, you know, the upper middle classes lived very well in Johannesburg and unfortunately there was just such a huge discrepancy between the classes. But when since I’ve come to Canada the main thing I’ve been thinking about, mainly like, that I miss a lot during Johannesburg  and like, what I like what I remember most in terms of like the senses at least is the thunder storms, like in the summer there’s just these most amazing, beautiful thunder storms every afternoon after it’s been boiling hot the whole day and like lightning and thunder and then it just cools down and you see the steam coming off the streets and it’s just, you can smell the irons in the air, you know,  it’s just that’s like the height of, height of thunder storms. You know [unclear] just so beautiful and [unclear] but, but yeah, I mean, yeah [laughs]. And it was cool growing up in Johannesburg, and, you know unfortunately there’s no public transport, so, and, although that’s changing I think, I’m not sure, but there was no public transport so you’re very, very dependent on your parents to give you lifts around town and everything.  And, yeah, unfortunately, you cou(ldn’t), you know like, because it wasn’t always safe you couldn’t go out like you can in Toronto.  But it’s changing, you know, it’s cool, it’s getting bigger and bigger, and it’s developing as a city and …

TRANSCRIBED BY: Elizabeth Terrel and Mark Ingram

DATE OF TRANSCRIPTION (DD/MM/YYYY): 16/01/2008

PHONETIC TRANSCRIPTION OF UNSCRIPTED SPEECH: N/A

TRANSCRIBED BY: N/A

DATE OF TRANSCRIPTION (DD/MM/YYYY): N/A

SCHOLARLY COMMENTARY: N/A

COMMENTARY BY: N/A

DATE OF COMMENTARY (DD/MM/YYYY): N/A

The archive provides:

  • Recordings of accent/dialect speakers from the region you select.
  • Text of the speakers’ biographical details.
  • Scholarly commentary and analysis in some cases.
  • In most cases, an orthographic transcription of the speakers’ unscripted speech.  In a small number of cases, you will also find a narrow phonetic transcription of the sample (see Phonetic Transcriptions for a complete list).  The recordings average four minutes in length and feature both the reading of one of two standard passages, and some unscripted speech. The two passages are Comma Gets a Cure (currently our standard passage) and The Rainbow Passage (used in our earliest recordings).

 

For instructional materials or coaching in the accents and dialects represented here, please go to Other Dialect Services.