South Dakota 2

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BIOGRAPHICAL INFORMATION

AGE: 59

DATE OF BIRTH (DD/MM/YYYY): 03/05/1952

PLACE OF BIRTH: Hawarden, Iowa

GENDER: female

ETHNICITY: 90% Caucasian (English and Norwegian) and 10% Native American (Sioux)

OCCUPATION: administrative assistant

EDUCATION: high school diploma

AREA(S) OF RESIDENCE OUTSIDE REPRESENTATIVE REGION FOR LONGER THAN SIX MONTHS:

Subject was born in Iowa but raised in Alcester, South Dakota, where she was still living at the time of this interview.

OTHER INFLUENCES ON SPEECH:

As a child subject attended a “country school,” or a one-room school, now closed, in which eight grades were taught simultaneously by several local farm wives. The subject indicates that she was taught “phonics” by these South Dakota natives.

The text used in our recordings of scripted speech can be found by clicking here.

RECORDED BY: Priscilla Hagen

DATE OF RECORDING (DD/MM/YYYY): 04/08/2011

PHONETIC TRANSCRIPTION OF SCRIPTED SPEECH: N/A

TRANSCRIBED BY: N/A

DATE OF TRANSCRIPTION (DD/MM/YYYY): N/A

ORTHOGRAPHIC TRANSCRIPTION OF UNSCRIPTED SPEECH:

I have a sister that lives on the farm acreage where we grew up, and I have a son and a daughter. They both live in the Sioux Falls area and they have each a, uh, daughter, so we get to see our grandkids a lot of the time. I have a husband, and we’ve been married for thirty-eight and a half years and have lived in the same house. This was when I was a kid and on my dad’s side of the family, and my gramma would always meet us at the door, ah, for the Christmas supper with a tray full of little glass like communion glasses, and it would be filled with Christmas cheer. And the Christmas cheer was purple grape juice. And I remember wrinkling up my nose as I drank it, and then after the big potluck Christmas supper we would ah, ah, open gifts, but before the gift opening my Grampa would read ah, the Christmas story from the bible – and how I miss those days. I don’t know much about except that, ah, in the family history – it’s a great big, huge book that my mom’s relatives had put together, and it, he was an outlaw that came from England over on the Mayflower, and he, um, hid or was a stowaway on it. And that’s all I remember reading about him. In the same book, there is a picture of my great-great-grandmother who was three-quarter Sioux, and my mom looks, looked a lot like, uh, the coloring of a Sioux Indian, had kind of the nose of the Sioux Indian. And that’s really about all I know. And I’d like to tell one more interesting fact about my grandfather, how they came from Gentry, Arkansas, up here uh to South Dakota. Um, my grandpa ran for sheriff of the county, and the bet between him and the other guy was that whichever one lost would move out of, out of the state. My grandpa lost, and so they moved to South Dakota.

TRANSCRIBED BY: Priscilla Hagen

DATE OF TRANSCRIPTION (DD/MM/YYYY): 04/08/2011

PHONETIC TRANSCRIPTION OF UNSCRIPTED SPEECH: N/A

TRANSCRIBED BY: N/A

DATE OF TRANSCRIPTION (DD/MM/YYYY): N/A

SCHOLARLY COMMENTARY:

Subject uses lip rounding on the “o” in Dakota. Note the special pronunciation of “measure” and the slight nasality on the pronunciation of vowel “a.” Also note that the range of pitch is limited to just three to five notes.

COMMENTARY BY: Priscilla Hagen

DATE OF COMMENTARY (DD/MM/YYYY): 04/08/2011

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