Spain 2

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BIOGRAPHICAL INFORMATION

AGE: 24

DATE OF BIRTH (DD/MM/YYYY): 1976

PLACE OF BIRTH: Seville, Spain

GENDER: female

ETHNICITY: Caucasian/Spanish

OCCUPATION: exchange student, assistant tutor

EDUCATION: theatre degree from school in Spain

AREA(S) OF RESIDENCE OUTSIDE REPRESENTATIVE REGION FOR LONGER THAN SIX MONTHS: 

Subject was spending a year in the United States as the Spanish foreign-language assistant at Western Maryland College at the time of this interview.

OTHER INFLUENCES ON SPEECH: N/A

The text used in our recordings of scripted speech can be found by clicking here.

RECORDED BY: Elizabeth van den Berg

DATE OF RECORDING (DD/MM/YYYY): 12/2000

PHONETIC TRANSCRIPTION OF SCRIPTED SPEECH: N/A

TRANSCRIBED BY: N/A

DATE OF TRANSCRIPTION (DD/MM/YYYY): N/A

ORTHOGRAPHIC TRANSCRIPTION OF UNSCRIPTED SPEECH:

Well, I was born in Seville in the south of Spain in 1976, so I’m, I’m getting old. I am the little of my family; we are six children: three sisters and three brothers; and I am the little of the family, so, I don’t know; I have a lot of nephews, nieces, so, I don’t know, I miss them so much, because we have, I mean, my family, they are not only my family, they are also my best friends that I have; so I miss my parents my sisters, my brothers, my nephews, I miss everyone, I miss everyone, because I don’t know. But, it’s Christmas time and in this, in this days in my house, in my family, everybody, everybody gets drunk. Everybody, so in the holidays, OK, my sisters, they come to my house, my parents’ house, my brothers, and everybody has, you know, a big food for everybody, and everybody drink and drink and drink and drink. And so we spend the whole, the whole Christmas Eve drinking. So, my mother gets drunk, my father, my everything, everybody, everybody in my house gets drunk everybody [unclear]. We start to sing and to dance and then we start to call neighbors: “Hey! Do you want to come to my house? We’re having a party!” “Oh, yeah, sure.” And maybe we have 50 people in my house, everybody singing dancing. “Hey you have a bottle of rum?” “Yes, of course. Wait a minute, I’ll run over to my house. I’ll be back.” You know, so, I miss this because I’m busy; I’m going to be alone here in Westminster, aahh, and I miss that.

TRANSCRIBED BY: Elizabeth van den Berg

DATE OF TRANSCRIPTION (DD/MM/YYYY): N/A

PHONETIC TRANSCRIPTION OF UNSCRIPTED SPEECH: N/A

TRANSCRIBED BY: N/A

DATE OF TRANSCRIPTION (DD/MM/YYYY): N/A

SCHOLARLY COMMENTARY: 

Subject has a very strong Southern Spanish (Seville) dialect. There is a very prominent transformation of the “v” sound, becoming “b” in words such as “veterinary” and “very.” The short “i” sound lengthens to “eee” in “it.” She also often adds an intrusive “e” before words beginning with “s,” so “student” becomes “student” and “Spain” becomes “Espain.”

COMMENTARY BY: Elizabeth van den Berg

DATE OF COMMENTARY (DD/MM/YYYY): N/A

The archive provides:

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  • Text of the speakers’ biographical details.
  • Scholarly commentary and analysis in some cases.
  • In most cases, an orthographic transcription of the speakers’ unscripted speech.  In a small number of cases, you will also find a narrow phonetic transcription of the sample (see Phonetic Transcriptions for a complete list).  The recordings average four minutes in length and feature both the reading of one of two standard passages, and some unscripted speech. The two passages are Comma Gets a Cure (currently our standard passage) and The Rainbow Passage (used in our earliest recordings).

 

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