Sweden 2

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BIOGRAPHICAL INFORMATION

AGE: 22

DATE OF BIRTH (DD/MM/YYYY): 1984

PLACE OF BIRTH: Mölndal, Gothenburg, Sweden

GENDER: male

ETHNICITY: Caucasian/Swedish

OCCUPATION: student

EDUCATION: When recorded, subject was attending college.

AREA(S) OF RESIDENCE OUTSIDE REPRESENTATIVE REGION FOR LONGER THAN SIX MONTHS:

Subject had been attending college in the United States for just one month at the time of this recording.

OTHER INFLUENCES ON SPEECH: N/A

The text used in our recordings of scripted speech can be found by clicking here.

RECORDED BY: Joseph Papke

DATE OF RECORDING (DD/MM/YYYY): 24/07/2006

PHONETIC TRANSCRIPTION OF SCRIPTED SPEECH: N/A

TRANSCRIBED BY: N/A

DATE OF TRANSCRIPTION (DD/MM/YYYY): N/A

ORTHOGRAPHIC TRANSCRIPTION OF UNSCRIPTED SPEECH:

Yeah, we start learning, uh, English in school about the fourth grade, but it’s very integrated into the Swedish, uh, society as well, uh, because, uh, a lot of movies come from, uh, the U.S. and England, and, uh, if you’re interested in something usually when you go online, search online, you need to know, know English. So, I think the kids today have, uh, more bi-langua-, bi-language. Uh, we have, uh, one dialect that’s kind of the same for the whole country, like the newsmen and the reporters, but, uh, people in the south usually have, uh, influenced, uh, from, uh, Denmark, our, the neighbor down there, uh … Kind of sounds, uh, you know when you’re really drunk, you know, and try to speak [mumbles] … kind of like that. And, uh, we can have a fairly hard, actually, trying to, um, understand what, uh, what – people from south have a real thick accent. I would probably have a problem hearing what they’re saying. And I think there’s, actually, I think, uh, fairly big differences, uh, in the accents on, uh, a lot, uh, er, you don’t have to travel that far to experience a new dialect. So you can travel fairly short distance, like a two-hour drive, and would exp-, you would experience a fairly good, uh, difference. I’ve been to a, uh, language trip and to, uh, England about, uh, six, five or six years ago – something like that. But I really didn’t feel that I, I get speaking in English, because, you know, although everyone from the class was, uh, Swedish and, um, and I never got to use it in everyday life like I do here. All the people I’ve met have been really, really good people, cool people, nice people, and I get along with them very well. So, I don’t know if it’s … that, if that would be a common thing, you know? That everyone’s just super nice and, uh, having a good time all the time, or that, you know, I have met people that have good friends, kind of way. So I’ve got it really good with all the people here. And, uh, I’ve actually only been to North America for a month now, and, uh, I think my English has improved very much in this time. [Subject recites a Swedish proverb: När man talar om trollen så står de i farstun och lyssnar …] Uh, “Speaking of the devil, they’re standing and listening.” Yeah, yeah, exactly, uh, this one is speaking about the person and, uh, suddenly they, they, uh …

TRANSCRIBED BY: Pete Cross

DATE OF TRANSCRIPTION (DD/MM/YYYY): 15/07/2008

PHONETIC TRANSCRIPTION OF UNSCRIPTED SPEECH: N/A

TRANSCRIBED BY: N/A

DATE OF TRANSCRIPTION (DD/MM/YYYY): N/A

SCHOLARLY COMMENTARY: N/A

COMMENTARY BY: N/A

DATE OF COMMENTARY (DD/MM/YYYY): N/A

The archive provides:

  • Recordings of accent/dialect speakers from the region you select.
  • Text of the speakers’ biographical details.
  • Scholarly commentary and analysis in some cases.
  • In most cases, an orthographic transcription of the speakers’ unscripted speech.  In a small number of cases, you will also find a narrow phonetic transcription of the sample (see Phonetic Transcriptions for a complete list).  The recordings average four minutes in length and feature both the reading of one of two standard passages, and some unscripted speech. The two passages are Comma Gets a Cure (currently our standard passage) and The Rainbow Passage (used in our earliest recordings).

 

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