Texas 19

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BIOGRAPHICAL INFORMATION

AGE: 42

DATE OF BIRTH (DD/MM/YYYY): 10/08/1970

PLACE OF BIRTH: Irving, Texas

GENDER: female

ETHNICITY: Caucasian

OCCUPATION: homemaker

EDUCATION: high school

AREAS OF RESIDENCE OUTSIDE REPRESENTATIVE REGION FOR LONGER THAN SIX MONTHS:

The speaker has never lived outside Texas.

OTHER INFLUENCES ON SPEECH:

She grew up in Irving until age 13, when she moved to Mineola, and she has lived there since.

The text used in our recordings of scripted speech can be found by clicking here.

RECORDED BY: Stephen Howell (under supervision of David Nevell)

DATE OF RECORDING (DD/MM/YYYY): 09/04/2013

PHONETIC TRANSCRIPTION OF SCRIPTED SPEECH: N/A

TRANSCRIBED BY: N/A

DATE OF TRANSCRIPTION (DD/MM/YYYY): N/A

ORTHOGRAPHIC TRANSCRIPTION OF UNSCRIPTED SPEECH:

OK, let me tell you about the first time I really got your dad’s attention. We were in high school, he was a senior — I was a junior — and for some reason we got stuck in the same P.E. class. I was a little nervous about this ‘cause he was real athletic and I do not have an athletic bone in my body. But I thought, “I can do this; I am gonna prove to him that I can do this.” So one day the coach decided we were gonna play this game called volleyball-basketball. Kinda crazy, I know, it’s like basketball, but you play with a volleyball: You don’t dribble, you just run up and down the court and you shoot for a basket. Well of course, your dad got picked as one of the captains. And I can’t remember if he voluntarily picked me to be on his team, or if it just, I was one of the last few left and I got pushed over to his team, but, anyways, we did end up on the same team. And, uh, things were going pretty good — pretty close game — I was running up and down the court like any other player, acting like I knew what I was doing. And, um, we were down by one. And I remember: I ran, got underneath the basket, and I told myself I’m going to be the hero of this game. And I yelled your dad’s name, and I said, “I’m open, I’m open!” He threw me the ball, and all I can remember … I reached my arms out to grab this ball, and I was watching it the whole way, and right before it got to me, I closed my eyes. And that ball hit me right in the face! [laughs] It was awful. I was never so embarrassed in my life. But I didn’t cry. I just started laughing — and then everybody started laughing — and we lost the game, but I think I got his attention, ‘cause he married me and we’ve been married for almost twenty-four years, so, but I’m still not the athlete he’d like for me to be.

TRANSCRIBED BY: Stephen Howell (under supervision of David Nevell)

DATE OF TRANSCRIPTION (DD/MM/YYYY): 09/04/2013

PHONETIC TRANSCRIPTION OF UNSCRIPTED SPEECH: N/A

TRANSCRIBED BY: N/A

DATE OF TRANSCRIPTION (DD/MM/YYYY): N/A

SCHOLARLY COMMENTARY: N/A

COMMENTARY BY: N/A

DATE OF COMMENTARY (DD/MM/YYYY): N/A

The archive provides:

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