England 13

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BIOGRAPHICAL INFORMATION

AGE: 43

DATE OF BIRTH (DD/MM/YYYY): 1957

PLACE OF BIRTH: Newcastle, Tyne & Wear

GENDER: female

ETHNICITY: white

OCCUPATION: college lecturer

EDUCATION: university

AREA(S) OF RESIDENCE OUTSIDE REPRESENTATIVE REGION FOR LONGER THAN SIX MONTHS:

Subject moved to Merseyside at age 33.

OTHER INFLUENCES ON SPEECH: N/A

The text used in our recordings of scripted speech can be found by clicking here.

RECORDED BY: Lise Olson

DATE OF RECORDING (DD/MM/YYYY): 14/07/2000

PHONETIC TRANSCRIPTION OF SCRIPTED SPEECH: N/A

TRANSCRIBED BY: N/A

DATE OF TRANSCRIPTION (DD/MM/YYYY): N/A

ORTHOGRAPHIC TRANSCRIPTION OF UNSCRIPTED SPEECH:

Um, it was about ten years ago when I moved down here from Newcastle. And I’d lived in Newcastle for thirty-three years, at the time. Lived with my mum and dad and then left and went to university, so I was Newcastle born and bred really. And when we got the opportunity to move down here, it was actually quite scary, you know, having lived there for such a long time. Um, but, there we were, traveling down on the M-62 in this whole new place, you know, with a very small baby. And, ah, I arrived here and set about making a new life down here in the northwest. So it was all quite odd really, ‘cause I left a very extended family, you know, lots and lots of brothers and br… my brother’s family — big family around him — aunties, uncles and all, you know, all those, and, um, they’re all still there, so I go back quite often. But I think since I moved down here, really, apart from making a new home, making a new life and having two kids who’ve now grown up as Scouse kids, very strong Scouse accents, um, one of the things that I miss most really is, is my accent, ‘cause I think I have become quite a posh Geordie in lots of ways. And I think I’ve lost the edge, I think the intonation’s still there, um, when I go home, as, of course I fall back into the old patterns. And as I say I do go back probably once a month. But it’s, um, it’s quite odd really, feeling a bit on an exile, albeit only two hundred miles across the country, I do feel exiled from my home [laughing], which sounds very strange. And there are lots of times when I think, “Gosh, it’d be nice to go back.” I’d love to go home again, I’d love to, to live back there, but I don’t think I ever will now. I think it’s, it’s gone on, gone too long. So, here I am. And, ah, enjoy my life, I enjoy my job, I enjoy, you know, my friends and the kind of people that have gathered, I’ve gathered around over the ten years that I’ve lived around, down here. So it’s a good life.

TRANSCRIBED BY: Mitchell Kelly

DATE OF TRANSCRIPTION (DD/MM/YYYY): 10/09/2007

PHONETIC TRANSCRIPTION OF UNSCRIPTED SPEECH: N/A

TRANSCRIBED BY: N/A

DATE OF TRANSCRIPTION (DD/MM/YYYY): N/A

SCHOLARLY COMMENTARY:

This “Geordie” (Newcastle) example is rather “posh.” The subject has been highly educated and works as a university lecturer, so some of the sounds are coming a bit closer to Received Pronunciation, but she is still recognized as a “voice from Newcastle.”

COMMENTARY BY: Lise Olson

DATE OF COMMENTARY (DD/MM/YYYY): 14/07/2000

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