England 79

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BIOGRAPHICAL INFORMATION

AGE: 23

DATE OF BIRTH (DD/MM/YYYY): 1984

PLACE OF BIRTH: central London

GENDER: female

ETHNICITY: white

OCCUPATION: student

EDUCATION: university

AREA(S) OF RESIDENCE OUTSIDE REPRESENTATIVE REGION FOR LONGER THAN SIX MONTHS: N/A

OTHER INFLUENCES ON SPEECH:

Subject’s father is from Glasgow, Scotland, and while this does not appear to have influenced her accent, she feels that his general articulatory habits may have impacted her own speech.

The text used in our recordings of scripted speech can be found by clicking here.

RECORDED BY: Marina Tyndall

DATE OF RECORDING (DD/MM/YYYY): 18/01/2008

PHONETIC TRANSCRIPTION OF SCRIPTED SPEECH: N/A

TRANSCRIBED BY: N/A

DATE OF TRANSCRIPTION (DD/MM/YYYY): N/A

ORTHOGRAPHIC TRANSCRIPTION OF UNSCRIPTED SPEECH:

I’m 23; my, I was born in central London somewhere, I don’t know exactly where, somewhere I- I live currently Farringdon, between Farringdon and Chancery Lane, erm, and I- I’ve stayed in that place my whole life. My dad’s got a very very strong Glasgow accent, but I can’t even mimic it at all except for like one thing, and when we were little we always use to go to G-like-Glasgow for like, four, five times a year, but we- it was only for couple of weeks; we never stayed up there for long. And, erm, I think that’s why I’m very lazy in the way I talk. Because like s- they don’t- uh, I don’t know my dad — it’s hard to understand what he’s saying; I don’t know whether Scottish people use their tongue less or more, but like my- I have a really lazy tongue where, I have to really try and over-pronounciate [sic] the words otherwise they’ll just come up like “wlerlerwreuhh.” Erm, so that’s something since I started this course I’ve been trying to work on is trying to speak properly, and like pronounciate [sic] and speak clearer and slower ‘cause I can have a real tendency just to speak fast, and it all comes out and you’ve probably seen that in the classes as well, like me just going “beuberlughberluhhrluuh.” Erm, and some people say I sound like I’m from South London, but I’ve never lived in South London. Steve said that, and I don’t think that’s true. Erm, and yeah, I don’t I don’t think I sound like I’m from South London … but then I don’t actually know what South London people sound like. Erm, so yeah. The end. [laughter]

TRANSCRIBED BY: N/A

DATE OF TRANSCRIPTION (DD/MM/YYYY): N/A

PHONETIC TRANSCRIPTION OF UNSCRIPTED SPEECH: N/A

TRANSCRIBED BY: N/A

DATE OF TRANSCRIPTION (DD/MM/YYYY): N/A

SCHOLARLY COMMENTARY:

Listen for very open COMMA and LETTER vowels, and labiodental substitutions on dental fricatives.

COMMENTARY BY: Marina Tyndall

DATE OF COMMENTARY (DD/MM/YYYY): 18/01/2008

The archive provides:

  • Recordings of accent/dialect speakers from the region you select.
  • Text of the speakers’ biographical details.
  • Scholarly commentary and analysis in some cases.
  • In most cases, an orthographic transcription of the speakers’ unscripted speech.  In a small number of cases, you will also find a narrow phonetic transcription of the sample (see Phonetic Transcriptions for a complete list).  The recordings average four minutes in length and feature both the reading of one of two standard passages, and some unscripted speech. The two passages are Comma Gets a Cure (currently our standard passage) and The Rainbow Passage (used in our earliest recordings).

 

For instructional materials or coaching in the accents and dialects represented here, please go to Other Dialect Services.