Florida 3

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BIOGRAPHICAL INFORMATION

AGE: 20

DATE OF BIRTH (DD/MM/YYYY): N/A

PLACE OF BIRTH: Pensacola, Florida

GENDER: male

ETHNICITY: Caucasian

OCCUPATION: student

EDUCATION: When recorded, subject was a beginning theatre student.

AREA(S) OF RESIDENCE OUTSIDE REPRESENTATIVE REGION FOR LONGER THAN SIX MONTHS:

Subject was born in Pensacola, Florida, raised in Virginia Beach, Virginia, until age 5, and has lived the remainder of his life in Pensacola.

OTHER INFLUENCES ON SPEECH:

Subject has trained in singing, but not speaking or speech. Both of his parents are from Montville, New Jersey.

The text used in our recordings of scripted speech can be found by clicking here.

RECORDED BY: N/A

DATE OF RECORDING (DD/MM/YYYY): N/A

PHONETIC TRANSCRIPTION OF SCRIPTED SPEECH: N/A

TRANSCRIBED BY: N/A

DATE OF TRANSCRIPTION (DD/MM/YYYY): N/A

ORTHOGRAPHIC TRANSCRIPTION OF UNSCRIPTED SPEECH:

Well, uh, one of the most interesting things that went on this summer was that my parents went away for their anniversary. And my sister, Tullah [spelling?], who’s … she’s a little younger than me. She’s, uh, 17 now? Uh, 16. It’s terrible, I don’t even know her age sometimes. Uh, she, uh, she decided she was going to throw a party. [Laughs] And it … she tells me, and she told me I have two options: I could either stop her by calling the — my — our parents, and, uh, which would prevent … or threatening to do that. Or I could, or I could let it go. Um, since I was — been taking psychology, um, I, uh, I figured that I thought it would be safer to let her throw the party, and let me be around to save her butt, since I had this weird feeling that it just wo- something bad was just gonna happen. Um, rather than not, and have her hate me, and then wait until I’m in school and my parents are away again for her to throw another party. So, um, so, I let her have it. And, uh, by the time I got back — ’cause I was in play rehearsal at the time — by the time I got back, it was about 12 in the morning, so, um, I get, I get there, and there was about 30 kids, which shocked the heck out of me, ’cause I thought there was only supposed to be like 12 people. And, um, some of the kids started to riot, apparently. And I — this is what I can’t stand, high school. [Laughs] What I hate: Anything about high school, from the past. Eh, there was a break. I guess there was some kids from Merit Island High School, um, as opposed to where my sister and I used to go to, which was Sally High School. And I guess one of the Sally kids said somethin’ about — really rude to one of the Merit Island kids, and it started like a riot. And, um, some of the kids actually had w–, um, one of the kids had a bottle, and one kid had a knife, and that was it. I just … when I got there, I just called the cops, and had ’em, had ’em taken down, which, uh, so, I guess I was right about it, feelin’ like it was gonna be a probl– big problem. Uh, but at least she learned a lesson. I mean, she was scared out of her wits. Uh, she wouldn’– I don’t think she’ll ever do it again, and, uh, so that’s about it. …

TRANSCRIBED BY: Jacqueline Baker

DATE OF TRANSCRIPTION (DD/MM/YYYY): 30/10/2007

PHONETIC TRANSCRIPTION OF UNSCRIPTED SPEECH: N/A

TRANSCRIBED BY: N/A

DATE OF TRANSCRIPTION (DD/MM/YYYY): N/A

SCHOLARLY COMMENTARY:

There is an overall nasal quality to the voice. There is an overall usage of the /ɑ/ sound for the low back vowels. The R consonant is quite pronounced and made with a velar /ɰ/ placement. The subject has an interesting occurrence in multi-syllabic words where syllables are broken up by alveolar consonants (“medicine” and “managed”). The consonants are not completely hit to break the syllable. Instead there is an approximation close to the sound with a breath pulse giving the syllable break. There is a slight splashy quality to the /s/ sound. Final voiced consonants tend to devoice. There is a pronunciation quality that is certainly learned from the parents. Words, like “huge” lose the quality of the H to become /jud͡ʒ/.

COMMENTARY BY: N/A Unicode trans. Dylan Paul

DATE OF COMMENTARY (DD/MM/YYYY): N/A

The archive provides:

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  • Text of the speakers’ biographical details.
  • Scholarly commentary and analysis in some cases.
  • In most cases, an orthographic transcription of the speakers’ unscripted speech.  In a small number of cases, you will also find a narrow phonetic transcription of the sample (see Phonetic Transcriptions for a complete list).  The recordings average four minutes in length and feature both the reading of one of two standard passages, and some unscripted speech. The two passages are Comma Gets a Cure (currently our standard passage) and The Rainbow Passage (used in our earliest recordings).

 

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