Greece 4

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BIOGRAPHICAL INFORMATION

AGE: 20

DATE OF BIRTH (DD/MM/YYYY): 19/04/1990

PLACE OF BIRTH: Austin, Texas, United States

GENDER: male

ETHNICITY: Caucasian

OCCUPATION: book seller

EDUCATION: sophomore in college

AREA(S) OF RESIDENCE OUTSIDE REPRESENTATIVE REGION FOR LONGER THAN SIX MONTHS:

Subject was born in Texas but raised in Greece (Psachna, near Athens). He had been living in Texas for the two years prior to being recorded.

OTHER INFLUENCES ON SPEECH:

Father is American and mother is Greek. Subject spends his summers back in Greece.

The text used in our recordings of scripted speech can be found by clicking here.

RECORDED BY: Courtney L. Young

DATE OF RECORDING (DD/MM/YYYY): 16/04/2011

PHONETIC TRANSCRIPTION OF SCRIPTED SPEECH: N/A

TRANSCRIBED BY: N/A

DATE OF TRANSCRIPTION (DD/MM/YYYY): N/A

ORTHOGRAPHIC TRANSCRIPTION OF UNSCRIPTED SPEECH:

I am 20 years old. I was born April the 9th of 1990. My gender is male. I am white and I am a bookseller at Barnes & Noble. My educational level: I’m on my second year of college. I was born is Austin, Texas, but raised in Greece in a really small village one hour north of Athens. The name of the village I grew up is called Psachna, and both my parents are school owners. They own a school that they teach English to Greek students. My mom was born and raised in the same village I grew up. After she turned 18, she moved to the US and joined the University of Houston, where she studied chemistry. My dad, on the other hand, he was born in Honolulu in Hawaii, and raised in Houston. They both met at work, and after they gave birth to me they moved to Greece, where they stayed and they still resident. I grew up in a farm, meaning, um, we had a lot of animals. We had goats. We had chicken. We had pigs. So every day me and my parents would go out milk the goats, feed all the animals, and the dogs and the cats. After that, me and my brother would get ready go to school while my mom would cook and simply prepare food for the family, so after school we could all get together and sit down and enjoy lunch. In Greece there are various activities that you can do. It’s more social. There are places where you can go outside, sit with your friends, have coffee, play backgammon, talk — all kind of different things. Especially during summer time you can go to the beaches where, that’s where everyone goes. They have cafeterias where you can grab coffee, you can relax, swim and just enjoy the beautiful weather. Other than that, you don’t really need a car in Greece to go anywhere simply because there’s so many public transportation; you can take a bus, you can take the Metro, and it will take you everywhere, anywhere really really fast. Life in Greece is very simple, and it’s really close with family, and it’s really simple, and luckily it’s really nice because you are close with your family and friends and you don’t have to drive for long. You don’t have to, you know, drive for two, three hours just to go to somewhere else. It’s everything is really close by. And that’s, that’s life in Greece.

TRANSCRIBED BY: Courtney L. Young

DATE OF TRANSCRIPTION (DD/MM/YYYY): 16/04/2011

PHONETIC TRANSCRIPTION OF UNSCRIPTED SPEECH: N/A

TRANSCRIBED BY: N/A

DATE OF TRANSCRIPTION (DD/MM/YYYY): N/A

SCHOLARLY COMMENTARY: N/A

COMMENTARY BY: N/A

DATE OF COMMENTARY (DD/MM/YYYY): N/A

The archive provides:

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  • Text of the speakers’ biographical details.
  • Scholarly commentary and analysis in some cases.
  • In most cases, an orthographic transcription of the speakers’ unscripted speech.  In a small number of cases, you will also find a narrow phonetic transcription of the sample (see Phonetic Transcriptions for a complete list).  The recordings average four minutes in length and feature both the reading of one of two standard passages, and some unscripted speech. The two passages are Comma Gets a Cure (currently our standard passage) and The Rainbow Passage (used in our earliest recordings).

 

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