New Mexico 3

Both as a courtesy and to comply with copyright law, please remember to credit IDEA for direct or indirect use of samples.  IDEA is a free resource; please consider supporting us.


BIOGRAPHICAL INFORMATION

AGE: 37

DATE OF BIRTH (DD/MM/YYYY): 04/10/1972

PLACE OF BIRTH: Gallup, New Mexico

GENDER: male

ETHNICITY: Native American (Zuni-Navajo)

OCCUPATION: cook

EDUCATION: college

AREA(S) OF RESIDENCE OUTSIDE REPRESENTATIVE REGION FOR LONGER THAN SIX MONTHS:

Subject grew up among Zuni and Navajo family members in Gallup, New Mexico, but spent much time on the Zuni reservation as well. He also spent time in Japan while in the Navy.  He had been living in Albuquerque, New Mexico, for 11 years at the time of this interview.

OTHER INFLUENCES ON SPEECH: N/A

The text used in our recordings of scripted speech can be found by clicking here.

RECORDED BY: Tanera Marshall

DATE OF RECORDING (DD/MM/YYYY): 26/09/2009

PHONETIC TRANSCRIPTION OF SCRIPTED SPEECH: N/A

TRANSCRIBED BY: N/A

DATE OF TRANSCRIPTION (DD/MM/YYYY): N/A

ORTHOGRAPHIC TRANSCRIPTION OF UNSCRIPTED SPEECH:

Oh my grandmother made, uh, made, uh, the greatest pancakes in the morning, and uh, you know, you, you, you made sure you got up early enough to get ‘em while they’re fresh and they’re hot, you know. It was, like, basic cooking, you know, with my family, but you know, being in Zuni … um, we have our different things for different times of the year that we do. And um, my grandmother, she makes some blue-corn tamales with, uh, mutton in it, you know. And they’re really good. And I try to make ‘em, but they don’t come out near as good as hers do. She, she wants to put some’m, you know, that final ingredient, you know, and when I turn around the corner, you know, to get a glass of water. It’s called experience. But things like that, you know, the — like blue corn tamales and, and of course our own bread — you know in Zuni we do, uh, we do a sourdough bread, that starts with the, you know, with the mother piece. So you know, whenever you just pinch one off, you know, and keep it off to the side, so there’s bread out there that has, still, stuff in it from, you know, a long long time ago and that’s great. It’s awesome. Um, we also do like a lamb, backbone stew — take the backbone from the sheep and, and, uh cook it with hominy, season it; it’s really good — red chili paste; it’s awesome. There’s a lot, a lotta food I love from Zuni. And we butchered, every year-end, a sheep, so we always had, uh, mutton and, and lamb meat on hand almost all year round. All our family comes together, you know, all my aunties, my mother, grandpa and grandma, all converge in Zuni and feast. Everybody brings something. Everybody brings what they’re known for. …

TRANSCRIBED BY: Tanera Marshall

DATE OF TRANSCRIPTION (DD/MM/YYYY): 26/09/2009

PHONETIC TRANSCRIPTION OF UNSCRIPTED SPEECH: N/A

TRANSCRIBED BY: N/A

DATE OF TRANSCRIPTION (DD/MM/YYYY): N/A

SCHOLARLY COMMENTARY: N/A

COMMENTARY BY: N/A

DATE OF COMMENTARY (DD/MM/YYYY): N/A

The archive provides:

  • Recordings of accent/dialect speakers from the region you select.
  • Text of the speakers’ biographical details.
  • Scholarly commentary and analysis in some cases.
  • In most cases, an orthographic transcription of the speakers’ unscripted speech.  In a small number of cases, you will also find a narrow phonetic transcription of the sample (see Phonetic Transcriptions for a complete list).  The recordings average four minutes in length and feature both the reading of one of two standard passages, and some unscripted speech. The two passages are Comma Gets a Cure (currently our standard passage) and The Rainbow Passage (used in our earliest recordings).

 

For instructional materials or coaching in the accents and dialects represented here, please go to Other Dialect Services.