Illinois 8

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BIOGRAPHICAL INFORMATION

AGE: 20

DATE OF BIRTH (DD/MM/YYYY): 1984

PLACE OF BIRTH: Chicago, Illinois

GENDER: male

ETHNICITY: N/A

OCCUPATION: student

EDUCATION: When recorded, subject was a sophomore acting major at university.

AREA(S) OF RESIDENCE OUTSIDE REPRESENTATIVE REGION FOR LONGER THAN SIX MONTHS:

Subject was attending school at the University of Illinois – Urbana/Champaign at the time of this interview.

OTHER INFLUENCES ON SPEECH: N/A

The text used in our recordings of scripted speech can be found by clicking here.

RECORDED BY: Jill Walmsley Zager

DATE OF RECORDING (DD/MM/YYYY): 11/05/2004

PHONETIC TRANSCRIPTION OF SCRIPTED SPEECH: N/A

TRANSCRIBED BY: N/A

DATE OF TRANSCRIPTION (DD/MM/YYYY): N/A

ORTHOGRAPHIC TRANSCRIPTION OF UNSCRIPTED SPEECH:

I think this happened when I was in about 7th or 8th grade. It was in the summertime. My family and I had gone to Wisconsin to Mirror Lake, I think it was, to camp and we were out early in the morning fishing; my Dad, my Mom, my brother and I on the boat. And on the lake there are these bluffs alongside, on the banks; they’re really pretty, rocky, just red and really pretty. And we’re trolling along just fishing, relaxing, and we see a goat run by on the bluff and we go OK, that’s kind of odd, and my Dad had a camera with him — a video camera — so we took that out and started recording, and we kept going and we see a wolf run by in the same direction on the bluff, and we go OK, all right, this is pretty interesting. So we go we’re gonna go see what we can see, so there end up being what looked like two wolves there on the bluff, and they caught up with this goat, and we got this all on camera — we’re recording this — and these wolves attacked this goat and drag it from the bluff into the water, and there’s this whole fight in the water that they’re having, and they end up drowning the goat and eating it, and we have this all on camera. And my Mom’s freaking out, and my Dad and my brother and I are this is the coolest thing in the world; you know it was amazing. And we went back to the Lodge and told the woman at the desk about this, and she said “Yeah, there are goats here, but we don’t see many wolves,” but she mentioned that there had been Alaskan huskies that had gotten lose or free for a while, and it may very well have been them. It was pretty unbelievable to have been in Wisconsin to have seen that; that’s unexpected.

TRANSCRIBED BY: Jill Walmsley Zager

DATE OF TRANSCRIPTION (DD/MM/YYYY): 11/05/2004

PHONETIC TRANSCRIPTION OF UNSCRIPTED SPEECH: N/A

TRANSCRIBED BY: N/A

DATE OF TRANSCRIPTION (DD/MM/YYYY): N/A

SCHOLARLY COMMENTARY:

Present in his speech is the characteristic Chicago /ae/ vowel, slightly denasalized and with fairly typical head resonance. The vocal fry present in the reading of “Comma Gets a Cure” dissipates and finally disappears in the unscripted telling of the memory, and a quicker rate of utterance and use of more notes in his range are displayed.

COMMENTARY BY: Jill Walmsley Zager

DATE OF COMMENTARY (DD/MM/YYYY): 11/05/2004

The archive provides:

  • Recordings of accent/dialect speakers from the region you select.
  • Text of the speakers’ biographical details.
  • Scholarly commentary and analysis in some cases.
  • In most cases, an orthographic transcription of the speakers’ unscripted speech.  In a small number of cases, you will also find a narrow phonetic transcription of the sample (see Phonetic Transcriptions for a complete list).  The recordings average four minutes in length and feature both the reading of one of two standard passages, and some unscripted speech. The two passages are Comma Gets a Cure (currently our standard passage) and The Rainbow Passage (used in our earliest recordings).

 

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