Maine 3

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BIOGRAPHICAL INFORMATION

AGE: 95

DATE OF BIRTH (DD/MM/YYYY): 13/11/1915

PLACE OF BIRTH: Nobleboro, Maine

GENDER: female

ETHNICITY: Caucasian

OCCUPATION: retired

EDUCATION: high school

AREA(S) OF RESIDENCE OUTSIDE REPRESENTATIVE REGION FOR LONGER THAN SIX MONTHS:

Subject lived around the town of Nobleboro her whole life.

OTHER INFLUENCES ON SPEECH: N/A

The text used in our recordings of scripted speech can be found by clicking here.

RECORDED BY: Kathleen Mulligan, Hallie Peterson, Luke Wise and Elizabeth Ellson

DATE OF RECORDING (DD/MM/YYYY): 09/03/2011

PHONETIC TRANSCRIPTION OF SCRIPTED SPEECH: N/A

TRANSCRIBED BY: N/A

DATE OF TRANSCRIPTION (DD/MM/YYYY): N/A

ORTHOGRAPHIC TRANSCRIPTION OF UNSCRIPTED SPEECH:

I was born at Damariscotta Mills, which is a section of the town of Nobleboro in the state of Maine. Uh, on the fifteenth of November, 1915. My father at the time was working in a factory; my mother was a housewife. However, she had been working in a telephone office before her marriage and she, when my youngest, when my brother became 5 years old she went back to work for the phone company. And my mother always worked, and I remember her having a basketball team. My father also owned an island on Damariscotta Lake, which was about eight miles from the place where we lived because we were right on the edge of the lake where I was born. The house belonged to my grandparents, and I was born there in the front room. My father got the island that he owned by eminent domain; nobody wanted the islands on the lake at that time; property was only worth something because you had animals and they could drink water out of the lake. My father and seven or eight other guys who were friend of his built a small camp there, and it’s the camp, camp that we’re still using and that was probably in 1913. The chimney was built the day after I was a year old; that would be 1916. Ah, yes, I remember going to Big Pine, which was another island that was owned by a man by the name of Glidden, and he had abandoned the place because he didn’t have any money, and I can remember my father showing me a boat that they had in the boathouse there, and he lifted me up over the side of it and told me to remember it because I’d never see anything like it again. And it was uh, that, uh, vacuum; I can’t remember the name now, but anyhow it had all kinds of petcocks and screws and [laughter] all kinds of things on it.

TRANSCRIBED BY: Kathleen Mulligan, Hallie Peterson, Luke Wise and Max Lorne-Kraus

DATE OF TRANSCRIPTION (DD/MM/YYYY): 09/03/2011

PHONETIC TRANSCRIPTION OF UNSCRIPTED SPEECH: N/A

TRANSCRIBED BY: N/A

DATE OF TRANSCRIPTION (DD/MM/YYYY): N/A

SCHOLARLY COMMENTARY: N/A

COMMENTARY BY: N/A

DATE OF COMMENTARY (DD/MM/YYYY): N/A

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