Puerto Rico 10

Both as a courtesy and to comply with copyright law, please remember to credit IDEA for direct or indirect use of samples. IDEA is a free resource; please consider supporting us.



BIOGRAPHICAL INFORMATION

AGE: 34

DATE OF BIRTH (DD/MM/YYYY): 05/05/1982

PLACE OF BIRTH: San Juan, Puerto Rico

GENDER: female

ETHNICITY: Puerto Rican

OCCUPATION: stay-at-home mom

EDUCATION: four-year university

AREAS OF RESIDENCE OUTSIDE REPRESENTATIVE REGION FOR LONGER THAN SIX MONTHS:

The speaker was born in San Juan but moved to Aibonito almost immediately. She lived in Aibonito for 27 years. She then spent three years as a student in San Juan before moving to a municipality called Cayey, which neighbors Aibonito. She spent the two years prior to this recording living in Michigan, in the United States.

OTHER INFLUENCES ON SPEECH:

The speaker’s first language is Spanish. She studied English while living in Puerto Rico. As a university student, she studied French.

The text used in our recordings of scripted speech can be found by clicking here.

RECORDED BY: Kathryn Stahl (under supervision of Deric McNish)

DATE OF RECORDING (DD/MM/YYYY): 03/04/2017

PHONETIC TRANSCRIPTION OF SCRIPTED SPEECH: N/A

TRANSCRIBED BY: N/A

DATE OF TRANSCRIPTION (DD/MM/YYYY): N/A

ORTHOGRAPHIC TRANSCRIPTION OF UNSCRIPTED SPEECH:

I’m um — people say I’m funny person and in — the clown almost as funny. But my, my professor introduce you to the clown, and you try to make the opposite of your personality in clown. And for me so hard because he say, that the really — you, your, your clown is born. And if you are funny, you need, mm, discover other mode or other personality of your clown. And he, he teach us that our clown is born from us and take time, take time — not, not put a red nose and and st- and step in front of people no you need to study a lot, a lot; and first, first we take a pan- pantomima- panto- pantomime class is the first class then the last class; the fourth class is the clown. And you discover your clown without a nose. For me, when I put my nose, it’s like I put on mask. And I feel comfort. When I don’t have the ma- the nose or the mask, it’s like nude and say, oh,  I feel not protect. And that the reason that he teach you that you need create your clown for you feel comfort in your clown.

[Subject speaks Spanish]: Yo comence’ hacer bizcochos hace como un ano atrás. Cuando tuve a Mateo estaba en casa aburrida y sola y empecé’ a ver videos en YouTube.

[English translation: I start making cake like almost one year ago. When I have Mateo, I was in my home bored and alone, and I begin to see videos on YouYube.]

TRANSCRIBED BY: Kathryn Stahl (under supervision of Deric McNish)

DATE OF TRANSCRIPTION (DD/MM/YYYY): 07/04/2017

PHONETIC TRANSCRIPTION OF UNSCRIPTED SPEECH: N/A

TRANSCRIBED BY: N/A

DATE OF TRANSCRIPTION (DD/MM/YYYY): N/A

SCHOLARLY COMMENTARY:

This subject speaks English as a second language. Word mispronunciations may be a result of English-language skills, rather than dialect. The subject provided the transcription and translation of the Spanish part of her interview.

COMMENTARY BY: Deric McNish

DATE OF COMMENTARY (DD/MM/YYYY): 30/04/2017

The archive provides:

  • Recordings of accent/dialect speakers from the region you select.
  • Text of the speakers’ biographical details.
  • Scholarly commentary and analysis in some cases.
  • In most cases, an orthographic transcription of the speakers’ unscripted speech.  In a small number of cases, you will also find a narrow phonetic transcription of the sample (see Phonetic Transcriptions for a complete list).  The recordings average four minutes in length and feature both the reading of one of two standard passages, and some unscripted speech. The two passages are Comma Gets a Cure (currently our standard passage) and The Rainbow Passage (used in our earliest recordings).

For instructional materials or coaching in the accents and dialects represented here, please go to Other Dialect Services.