Wisconsin 10

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BIOGRAPHICAL INFORMATION

AGE: 19

DATE OF BIRTH (DD/MM/YYYY): 04/09/1997

PLACE OF BIRTH: Milwaukee, Wisconsin

GENDER: female

ETHNICITY: Caucasian

OCCUPATION: student

EDUCATION: BA in progress

AREAS OF RESIDENCE OUTSIDE REPRESENTATIVE REGION FOR LONGER THAN SIX MONTHS:

At the time of this recording, the speaker had spent the last two academic years in mid-Michigan, with summers and breaks in Milwaukee.

OTHER INFLUENCES ON SPEECH:

No other speech factors were identified.

The text used in our recordings of scripted speech can be found by clicking here.

RECORDED BY: Carlisle Shelson (under supervision of Deric McNish)

DATE OF RECORDING (DD/MM/YYYY): 01/04/2017

PHONETIC TRANSCRIPTION OF SCRIPTED SPEECH: N/A

TRANSCRIBED BY: N/A

DATE OF TRANSCRIPTION (DD/MM/YYYY): N/A

ORTHOGRAPHIC TRANSCRIPTION OF UNSCRIPTED SPEECH:

Um, so Milwaukee’s like, a city on, like, um, Lake Michigan. Like it’s on the lake, and in the summer time every year there’s, like, a kite festival, where, um, like, on the count of three everyone, like, puts all these kites in the air and then there’s, like, a billion kites in the air and there’s just all these colors. And it’s in the summer and on the lake front, so I would always do that with my dad and it was, like, really fun and a really cool thing in the city that I kind of grew up with.

That I can remember? Like, a week ago, I imagined that one of my best friends, Jill, was, um, like pregnant with triplets, and she is a triplet and, like, I was the only one who could, like, help her throughout her, like, pregnancy, so it was just, like, her and I and, like, all these kids.

Probably New Year’s, as weird that is, I don’t know, before — like the day — like New Year’s Eve, we would always just — my dad is a really good cook and he would make, like, a really nice, big dinner and we’d have like — the house would just be decorated and we’d, like, make punch and stay up all night and, like, watch, um, the New Year’s Eve ball drop in New York, so that was just always fun ‘cause my dad’s a really good cook, so …

My favorite food is pasta, so whenever he makes pasta, that’s really, really good. Um, he used to make, like, gou — my favorite as a kid was, like, goulash. I don’t know if you know what that is. But then, now, my favorite; he makes this really good jambalaya that’s … I really like. It’s, like, not authentic at all, I don’t think. Like, it only has the stuff I like in it, but it’s — I like it.

Oh, I guess, like, coming into college, so I had been in color guard, like, all of my life throughout, like, high school and everything I was the captain of our team, and whatever and we won a bunch of stuff, and I tried out for, like, the color guard team here, but in order to do that, so like, it was like, the audition was on a Wednesday; school ended on Tuesday, so I — school ended, it was my last day of high school. I got on a plane, flew to East Lansing; I knew nothing, no one, nothing; I, like, tried out for this color-guard team; it, like, didn’t go well; I had to get back on a plane and fly back for graduation. Um, I was, like, fighting with all my friends, so graduation was a mess, like, my graduation party was, like, a disaster. I didn’t make the color-guard team. That was not a great week.

Another color-guard thing: My senior year, I was like — I had this, like, huge, like, performance that we did during halftime and I, like, rolled my knee really weird, and then instead of just stopping, like, the show I just kept going which was, like, awful, and then afterwards, I was like, so in pain, I could not — I thought I broke my leg; I couldn’t move. I like, came home — so, my parents, like, carried me home. I was given something; I knocked out for, like, 48 hours, and then I woke up. I, like, had to use crunches for a month. I couldn’t perform. That was really …

I would want to be, um, a federal judge, uh, my dad, when — he had just retired, but he would, um, get sued all the time, so we would have to go to these federal court hearings in Chicago, which is so cool, um, to be able experience that, so I would love to be, like, a federal judge; like, not a lawyer or anything, just jump up to federal judge. I think that would be kind of cool.

TRANSCRIBED BY: Carlisle Shelson (under supervision of Deric McNish)

DATE OF TRANSCRIPTION (DD/MM/YYYY): 03/04/2017

PHONETIC TRANSCRIPTION OF UNSCRIPTED SPEECH: N/A

TRANSCRIBED BY: N/A

DATE OF TRANSCRIPTION (DD/MM/YYYY): N/A

SCHOLARLY COMMENTARY:

The speaker frequently replaces /t/ with a glottal stop in words like “ate,” “jacket,” “goat,” and “kite.” Her /k/ is an aspirated velar stop in words like “duke” and “cool.” Prominent vocal fry and uptalk may be related more to her age than her region. She demonstrates some characteristics of an Inland Northern dialect, such as the marry/merry/Mary merger, the /æ/ vowel becoming a tensed diphthong/eə/, and characteristic nasality.

COMMENTARY BY: Deric McNish

DATE OF COMMENTARY (DD/MM/YYYY): 06/04/2017

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