Anguilla 2

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BIOGRAPHICAL INFORMATION

AGE: 30

DATE OF BIRTH (DD/MM/YYYY): 10/10/1988

PLACE OF BIRTH: Georgetown, Guyana (but raised mostly in Anguilla)

GENDER: female

ETHNICITY: Afro-Indian-Chinese-Caucasian-Caribbean

OCCUPATION: guest-services agent

EDUCATION: high school

AREAS OF RESIDENCE OUTSIDE REPRESENTATIVE REGION FOR LONGER THAN SIX MONTHS:

The subject lived in Guyana until the age of 7, before moving to Anguilla. She spent two years living in Nevis from ages 13 to 15 but has been in Anguilla since then.

OTHER INFLUENCES ON SPEECH:

She says she feels that many years working in the tourism industry has changed had accent into a more standard English. She also says it is difficult to speak to the interviewer in her full dialect because the interviewer is not from Anguilla.

The text used in our recordings of scripted speech can be found by clicking here.

RECORDED BY: Tshari King

DATE OF RECORDING (DD/MM/YYYY): 19/08/2019

PHONETIC TRANSCRIPTION OF SCRIPTED SPEECH: N/A

TRANSCRIBED BY: N/A

DATE OF TRANSCRIPTION (DD/MM/YYYY): N/A

ORTHOGRAPHIC TRANSCRIPTION OF UNSCRIPTED SPEECH:

I grew up with my cousins, so basically my cousins is more like my brothers and my sisters. When I, um, first came to Anguilla, we all lived in one house in the Quarter, so it was like, yeah, they’re family. I was kinda sad when everybody move and went their separate ways. We don’t really think of the other cousins because they didn’t grow up with us, so they’re non-factors. [She laughs.] So there’s a few of us are really closer to each other than the others, so, yeah, I like them, but each person is — everybody is very unique in their own way, so you love each person individually, ‘cause you just know how that person are, and, so, we kind a work around that; so that’s how we end up being really good. …

Interviewer: What kind of games did you all used to play when you were young?

Aah! Ooh, hopscotch, hide and seek, tag, um, the clapping games; oh, those were nice. Mississippi, you remember Mississippi, with the rope? I mean nobody does that anymore. I don’t even think I can jum- jump that high anymore; you know, like you have ankles, knee-zees, bottoms, and waist. How we used to jump that high? I don’t know. I can’t do that now. You could do that? [Subject laughs.] …

TRANSCRIBED BY: Tshari King

DATE OF TRANSCRIPTION (DD/MM/YYYY): 22/08/2019

PHONETIC TRANSCRIPTION OF UNSCRIPTED SPEECH: N/A

TRANSCRIBED BY: N/A

DATE OF TRANSCRIPTION (DD/MM/YYYY): N/A

SCHOLARLY COMMENTARY: N/A

COMMENTARY BY: N/A

DATE OF COMMENTARY (DD/MM/YYYY): N/A

The archive provides:

  • Recordings of accent/dialect speakers from the region you select.
  • Text of the speakers’ biographical details.
  • Scholarly commentary and analysis in some cases.
  • In most cases, an orthographic transcription of the speakers’ unscripted speech.  In a small number of cases, you will also find a narrow phonetic transcription of the sample (see Phonetic Transcriptions for a complete list).  The recordings average four minutes in length and feature both the reading of one of two standard passages, and some unscripted speech. The two passages are Comma Gets a Cure (currently our standard passage) and The Rainbow Passage (used in our earliest recordings).

For instructional materials or coaching in the accents and dialects represented here, please go to Other Dialect Services.

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