Arkansas 19

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BIOGRAPHICAL INFORMATION

AGE: 39

DATE OF BIRTH (DD/MM/YYYY): 29/05/1980

PLACE OF BIRTH: Little Rock, Arkansas

GENDER: male

ETHNICITY: Caucasian

OCCUPATION: professor of history

EDUCATION: Ph.D in history, University of Mississippi

AREAS OF RESIDENCE OUTSIDE REPRESENTATIVE REGION FOR LONGER THAN SIX MONTHS:

The subject has lived outside Arkansas for about 13 years of his life. He lived in Jackson, Mississippi, for two years; Oxford, Mississippi, for nine years; and New Haven, Connecticut, for two years. Most of his time in Arkansas has been spent in Little Rock, but he also lived in Fayetteville for two and a half years.

OTHER INFLUENCES ON SPEECH:

His wife is from Tampa, Florida.

The text used in our recordings of scripted speech can be found by clicking here.

RECORDED BY: Ben Corbett

DATE OF RECORDING (DD/MM/YYYY): 25/10/2019

PHONETIC TRANSCRIPTION OF SCRIPTED SPEECH: N/A

TRANSCRIBED BY: N/A

DATE OF TRANSCRIPTION (DD/MM/YYYY): N/A

ORTHOGRAPHIC TRANSCRIPTION OF UNSCRIPTED SPEECH:

Grew up in, ah, Little Rock. Ah, went to public schools, and, uh, my mom was a art teacher in Little Rock, ah, so I went to school with her a bunch. Um, growin’ up, ‘n’, ah, went to Little Rock Central High School and, and enjoyed those years and then moved to Mississippi to go to college in Jackson, Mississippi, ah, for a couple of years: a small, small college, uh, there, and transferred up to Fayetteville, to the U of A. Met my wife here, and, ah, we then went to Mississippi, lived in Oxford, Mississippi. Enjoyed a lot of the good food and the small town that was intimidating at first in terms of being very, ah, elitist, had a elitist quality of it, about it, and, ah, we lived there for quite a while and, uh, nine years and then moved on to Connecticut. So, we got to eat lobster; we got to be exposed to real good pizza. Um, see there were three different pizza places that were really strong in, in New Haven. Ah, Peppy’s was the most famous of the, the three, and what we figured out over time was to order, ah, specific things, specific pizzas were much better at certain places than others, and that was the way to do that. So Peppy’s: We ended up getting like a gorgonzola-and-spinach, ah, pizza was really good. Um, the margarita pizza was good at, at, uh, oh gosh, I’ve forgotten the name already; um, I think it was Modern Pizza. Um, that was really good. And, um, they did Sally’s, which was the other big place to go to eat pizza. But, ah, lobster: That’s the, uh, that’s the other big food item we don’t necessarily have around these parts too much, that’s, uh, all that good, at least. Um, so we got to go to a lot of lobster shacks, um, on the coast of, of Connecticut, and, and in New Haven as well, so, um, those are some big things you enjoyed about living up there and things you miss. Um, then we moved to this area, back to this area, uh, five, over five years ago, and, uh, here we are.

TRANSCRIBED BY: Ben Corbett

DATE OF TRANSCRIPTION (DD/MM/YYYY): 26/10/2019

PHONETIC TRANSCRIPTION OF UNSCRIPTED SPEECH: N/A

TRANSCRIBED BY: N/A

DATE OF TRANSCRIPTION (DD/MM/YYYY): N/A

SCHOLARLY COMMENTARY:

The subject has a degree of jaw tension, which helps maintain a smaller amount of space between the upper and lower jaw. He also nasalize pitches from his chest, mouth, and teeth resonators. /r/ is formed with the back of the tongue and lengthened considerably (first, teacher, Roc, here, parts). The consonents /p/, /t/, /k/, /b/, /d/, and /g/ are given extra plosive force (put, picked, goose, dog, goat, tire, pizza, shacks). End /t/ is often given particular emphasis (it). However, the /t/ drops completely in the word “first.” /oʊ/ is hyponasal and sometimes is preceded by either a schwa /ə/ (comma) or /e/ (dress). Subject also pulls his tongue down considerably for /u/ (goose). /u/ (goose) can be hyponasal as well. The word “yellow” substitutes a schwa /ə/ (comma) for the unstressed ending /ou/ (goat). The /w/ sound that begins the word “we” becomes /hw/ (which). /aɪ/ diphthong (price) slightly reduces its second vowel (implied, quite, while, price — though subject corrects himself). The /ɔ/ vowel also appears in “palm.” /ae/ (trap) becomes a lengthened /e/ (dress) in the word “and.”

COMMENTARY BY: Ben Corbett

DATE OF COMMENTARY (DD/MM/YYYY): 26/10/2019

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