Philippines 15

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BIOGRAPHICAL INFORMATION

AGE: 18

DATE OF BIRTH (DD/MM/YYYY): 04/10/1997

PLACE OF BIRTH: Manila, Philippines

GENDER: male

ETHNICITY: Ilonggo Filipino and Japanese

OCCUPATION: student

EDUCATION: college/university

AREAS OF RESIDENCE OUTSIDE REPRESENTATIVE REGION FOR LONGER THAN SIX MONTHS:

The subject has not lived outside Manila for longer than six months.

OTHER INFLUENCES ON SPEECH:

His exposure to English is mainly through environment, media, and formal education. The subject is not a fluent speaker of his mother’s native tongue (Hiligaynon) and is more comfortable with English (which would help explain his almost total lack of a Filipino accent when speaking English) and occasionally Tagalog.

The text used in our recordings of scripted speech can be found by clicking here.

RECORDED BY: Aldrin Fauni-Tanos

DATE OF RECORDING (DD/MM/YYYY): 03/10/2016

PHONETIC TRANSCRIPTION OF SCRIPTED SPEECH: N/A

TRANSCRIBED BY: N/A

DATE OF TRANSCRIPTION (DD/MM/YYYY): N/A

ORTHOGRAPHIC TRANSCRIPTION OF UNSCRIPTED SPEECH:

So, last week, last month, I think, no, two months ago, my fr- my best friend in the whole world got into the university he wanted to go in, in the UK, and, man, I was so happy for him. He even got into a course that I wanted to go into at first, which was, like, history. My goodness, I, I kind of envy him because he has such a large library in, at his university. And here I’m stuck with, like, e-books and stuff. He’s, he had to learn about this, this, this, like, th- th- after the fall of Rome or something like that. And I had that in class recently in my, in my own world history, uh, subject. It was so watered down, I didn’t, I didn’t like it; it was — there was just was so much left out, and he got like two hours of comprehensive information. And I’m just, like, this happened, and this other thing happened, and he’s, and he gets the full experience, and ma- man, I was, I was so envious. I wanted to ask him if I should borrow a book from their library because he could do that. He could, he could get an e-book sent to me, and there would be no problem, and even if they didn’t have it, they’d just get it within five days or something like that. So, I mean, envious, but at least I have a resource.

Uh, but with that, I kind of wish I was going to something like that, because my university is not exactly comprehensive when it comes to that sort of subject or, because, uh, the — our university kind of likes to spread out its learning experience to other subjects, which is, which isn’t entirely bad, but sometimes you’re so uninterested and you don’t really give a, give any, give any care about it.

Actually, I do have some friends in the U.S. who are going under that school, school-loan thing. Like, they have forty-five thousand dollars in debt, and they have no idea what to do with it after graduating because they don’t have any sort of plan, and they still have to worry about that loan that they have to pay back. And you know, I just feel sorry for them, like, they have to deal with, like, the crappy policy of the government, and, uh, it was cautious because the government wanted to help the colleges, but now the, my friends are kind of suffering for it.

TRANSCRIBED BY: Aldrin Fauni-Tanos

DATE OF TRANSCRIPTION (DD/MM/YYYY): 03/10/2016

PHONETIC TRANSCRIPTION OF UNSCRIPTED SPEECH: N/A

TRANSCRIBED BY: N/A

DATE OF TRANSCRIPTION (DD/MM/YYYY): N/A

SCHOLARLY COMMENTARY: N/A

COMMENTARY BY: N/A

DATE OF COMMENTARY (DD/MM/YYYY): N/A

The archive provides:

  • Recordings of accent/dialect speakers from the region you select.
  • Text of the speakers’ biographical details.
  • Scholarly commentary and analysis in some cases.
  • In most cases, an orthographic transcription of the speakers’ unscripted speech.  In a small number of cases, you will also find a narrow phonetic transcription of the sample (see Phonetic Transcriptions for a complete list).  The recordings average four minutes in length and feature both the reading of one of two standard passages, and some unscripted speech. The two passages are Comma Gets a Cure (currently our standard passage) and The Rainbow Passage (used in our earliest recordings).

For instructional materials or coaching in the accents and dialects represented here, please go to Other Dialect Services.

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