South Korea 8

Both as a courtesy and to comply with copyright law, please remember to credit IDEA for direct or indirect use of samples. IDEA is a free resource; please consider supporting us.


BIOGRAPHICAL INFORMATION

AGE: 20

DATE OF BIRTH (DD/MM/YYYY): 29/10/1998

PLACE OF BIRTH: Incheon, South Korea

GENDER: male

ETHNICITY: Korean

OCCUPATION: student

EDUCATION: freshman in college

AREAS OF RESIDENCE OUTSIDE REPRESENTATIVE REGION FOR LONGER THAN SIX MONTHS:

At the time of this recording, the speaker had been living in East Lansing, Michigan, United States, for one year.

OTHER INFLUENCES ON SPEECH:

The speaker’s first language is Korean.

The text used in our recordings of scripted speech can be found by clicking here.

RECORDED BY: Mia Taylor (under supervision of Deric McNish)

DATE OF RECORDING (DD/MM/YYYY): 24/04/2019

PHONETIC TRANSCRIPTION OF SCRIPTED SPEECH: N/A

TRANSCRIBED BY: N/A

DATE OF TRANSCRIPTION (DD/MM/YYYY): N/A

ORTHOGRAPHIC TRANSCRIPTION OF UNSCRIPTED SPEECH:

I grew up in Incheon. That’s like, um, basically like California in the United States but way less popular version of it. Um, apparently it was, it used to be popular with like, um, oceans since it’s around the coastal area, so a lot of tourists came in and out around my town, but then later, um, since there were too many tourists, so the beach and ocean all got dirty, so no one really comes any- anymore. Um, even though I’m from, I’m around like a coastal city, I’m kinda more in the surface area. I don’t really like eating fish, too. Um, maybe grilled is fine, but people tend to eat fishes raw, and I don’t really like that, like sashimi or something like that. Um, anyways, um, that’s where I grew up. It’s, I guess not as different as our capital city, but then there are some stuff to enjoy there. Like there is Chinatown, where there’s a lot of like, um, Chinese community, within our, um, city. And also the place where I, like, grew up, during my elementary school to, like, now, where my family lives currently, um, there are a lot of in- um, foreign people, since there are a lot of, like, um, I guess, international companies — complexes are like everywhere. So I was able to see a lot of, like, fore- foreigners all around: either tourists or, like, just people who are working inside our city. …

TRANSCRIBED BY: Mia Taylor (under supervision of Deric McNish)

DATE OF TRANSCRIPTION (DD/MM/YYYY): 24/04/2019

PHONETIC TRANSCRIPTION OF UNSCRIPTED SPEECH: N/A

TRANSCRIBED BY: N/A

DATE OF TRANSCRIPTION (DD/MM/YYYY): N/A

SCHOLARLY COMMENTARY: N/A

COMMENTARY BY: N/A

DATE OF COMMENTARY (DD/MM/YYYY): N/A

The archive provides:

  • Recordings of accent/dialect speakers from the region you select.
  • Text of the speakers’ biographical details.
  • Scholarly commentary and analysis in some cases.
  • In most cases, an orthographic transcription of the speakers’ unscripted speech.  In a small number of cases, you will also find a narrow phonetic transcription of the sample (see Phonetic Transcriptions for a complete list).  The recordings average four minutes in length and feature both the reading of one of two standard passages, and some unscripted speech. The two passages are Comma Gets a Cure (currently our standard passage) and The Rainbow Passage (used in our earliest recordings).

For instructional materials or coaching in the accents and dialects represented here, please go to Other Dialect Services.