Chile 5

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BIOGRAPHICAL INFORMATION

AGE: 57

DATE OF BIRTH (DD/MM/YYYY): 31/01/1955

PLACE OF BIRTH: Talca, Chile

GENDER: female

ETHNICITY: Hispanic

OCCUPATION: scientific researcher

EDUCATION: doctorate

AREA(S) OF RESIDENCE OUTSIDE REPRESENTATIVE REGION FOR LONGER THAN SIX MONTHS:

Subject moved to the United States in 1983, at the age of 28, settling in Northville, Michigan, after some time in Cleveland, Ohio.

OTHER INFLUENCES ON SPEECH:

She learned English at high school in Chile.

The text used in our recordings of scripted speech can be found by clicking here.

RECORDED BY: Annette Masson

DATE OF RECORDING (DD/MM/YYYY): 01/07/2012

PHONETIC TRANSCRIPTION OF SCRIPTED SPEECH: N/A

TRANSCRIBED BY: N/A

DATE OF TRANSCRIPTION (DD/MM/YYYY): N/A

ORTHOGRAPHIC TRANSCRIPTION OF UNSCRIPTED SPEECH:

OK, so it’s, ah, funny that, ah, in this, ahm, story, they give ether to the goose. I’m, I, remember when I was in the high school in Chile and in … we had a science class, and, ah, we were, ah, studying “drosophilas melanogaster”: those little, ah, little fruit flies for genetic; and we were anesthetizing them with, ahm, not ether actually … with chloroform, which is not used anymore is because is very toxic; and we been 14, 15 years old; nobody knew about the dangers, you know. Now working in the university I know, I’m so aware of all the dangers … that the students are — we’re so careful of the rules in the lab — but in those days, nobody cared, so we passed around and we put, eh, the chloroform in the big clumps of cotton, and we put it on the, on the flies, and then we smell it and they smell it and they passed out right there, in class, and  ah, that it was like really bad because chloroform is toxic, you know, and we would never … begin with, we wouldn’t be using it and then we would having been doing this and and nobody would be allowed to do this, and there would be rules and everything. So I’m just thinking, you know, how much we have progressed in that stuff, and I see that these people are using ether; it always reminds me, you know, all the progress in the health and how in safety issues in schools and, ahm, so that’s it, so.

TRANSCRIBED BY: Annette Masson

DATE OF TRANSCRIPTION (DD/MM/YYYY): 01/07/2012

PHONETIC TRANSCRIPTION OF UNSCRIPTED SPEECH: N/A

TRANSCRIBED BY: N/A

DATE OF TRANSCRIPTION (DD/MM/YYYY): N/A

SCHOLARLY COMMENTARY: N/A

COMMENTARY BY: N/A

DATE OF COMMENTARY (DD/MM/YYYY): N/A

The archive provides:

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