Haiti 1

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BIOGRAPHICAL INFORMATION

AGE: 20s

DATE OF BIRTH (DD/MM/YYYY): 1970s

PLACE OF BIRTH: Port-au-Prince, Haiti

GENDER: male

ETHNICITY: Haitian (exact ethnicity unknown)

OCCUPATION: N/A

EDUCATION: Studied for BM in voice in Lawrence, Kansas, United States

AREA(S) OF RESIDENCE OUTSIDE REPRESENTATIVE REGION FOR LONGER THAN SIX MONTHS:

Subject moved to the United States at age 13.

OTHER INFLUENCES ON SPEECH:

Subject speaks fluent French and Creole.

The text used in our recordings of scripted speech can be found by clicking here.

RECORDED BY: Paul Meier and Megan Schemmel

DATE OF RECORDING (DD/MM/YYYY): 03/2000

PHONETIC TRANSCRIPTION OF SCRIPTED SPEECH: N/A

TRANSCRIBED BY: N/A

DATE OF TRANSCRIPTION (DD/MM/YYYY): N/A

ORTHOGRAPHIC TRANSCRIPTION OF UNSCRIPTED SPEECH:

I was born in Port-au-Prince, Haiti. Uh, eighty years, uh, a country who shares the island with the Dominican Republic. And, uh, Haiti is a small country, and the population is about six and a half million people. And, uh, it’s a not a very rich country, but it’s very lovely, it’s, uh, it’s you know in the middle of the Caribbean. So it’s, uh, a very nice place for tourists actually. Uh, actually in Haiti we have two languages, we have French which is our national language, and, uh, Creole which is our native language. Creole is spoken by everyone in Haiti because it’s a, it’s a the language everyone you know grew up, grew up, uh, learning, I mean speaking. It’s a mixture of, uh, several different, different languges: it’s a mixture of, uh, French, a little bit of Spanish, and, uh, some language from Africa which is, because you know this is where Haitians are originally from. And French is, uh, is the language that everyone will get a chance to…to go to school uh…(to) learn. ‘Cause all the books and all the materials are written in French. Here’s the French, uh, version of the Lord’s Prayer.
[Subject now speaks the French and Creole versions of the Lord’s Prayer.]
“Ki choy,” “ki choy” I would say is African. Uh, because we definitely don’t have it in, uh, in French. Where as “ciel” is definitely French, uh-huh. So it’s … I can’t remem- I can’t think of anything in Spanish, but I know there is something in there. Oh, yes, we have, uh, in Haiti we have a lot different lang- um, religions. We have, uh, Cath- the Catholicism is a predominant one, is it’s the main one there. But we have, uh, Baptists (unclear), and, uh, Jahova witnesses and all those that basically we can find in here. Except for the Voodoo one, Voodoo one that, uh, we … I don’t think you guys have in here. It’s a, it’s also practised in, uh, Cuba, I think. And, uh, I’m not sure for the Dominican Republic, but it’s I know they do it practise it in Cuba and Haiti. It’s, uh, sort of a prayer, like you know in the time when we when we have when we had slaves in Haiti, since, you know, they were not allowed to practise their own religion that the one they came from Africa with. So they were allowed to (unclear) uh forced to practise the one that, uh, the masters were practising, which was Catholicism. But at night, after their working hours, they would go out they would go in, uh, secret they would go somewhere else where their master wouldn’t find out, and have their personal ceremony their personal prayers, and I think that that that’s where Voodoo basically comes from.

TRANSCRIBED BY: Megan Schemmel (under the supervision of Paul Meier)

DATE OF TRANSCRIPTION (DD/MM/YYYY): N/A

PHONETIC TRANSCRIPTION OF UNSCRIPTED SPEECH: N/A

TRANSCRIBED BY: N/A

DATE OF TRANSCRIPTION (DD/MM/YYYY): N/A

SCHOLARLY COMMENTARY: N/A

COMMENTARY BY: N/A

DATE OF COMMENTARY (DD/MM/YYYY): N/A

The archive provides:

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