Kentucky 10

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BIOGRAPHICAL INFORMATION

AGE: 69

DATE OF BIRTH (DD/MM/YYYY): 1933

PLACE OF BIRTH: Marion, Kentucky

GENDER: male

ETHNICITY: Caucasian

OCCUPATION: retired farmer

EDUCATION: N/A

AREA(S) OF RESIDENCE OUTSIDE REPRESENTATIVE REGION FOR LONGER THAN SIX MONTHS: N/A

OTHER INFLUENCES ON SPEECH:

His land has been in his family for four generations.

The text used in our recordings of scripted speech can be found by clicking here.

RECORDED BY: Rena Cook

DATE OF RECORDING (DD/MM/YYYY): 12/08/2002

PHONETIC TRANSCRIPTION OF SCRIPTED SPEECH: N/A

TRANSCRIBED BY: N/A

DATE OF TRANSCRIPTION (DD/MM/YYYY): N/A

ORTHOGRAPHIC TRANSCRIPTION OF UNSCRIPTED SPEECH:

When my uncle still lived in, uh, my hometown of Marion, Kentucky, why he was, uh, he had a neighbor that, uh, was goin’ with a, uh, fella that her parents didn’t like. So they wanted to get married and, uh, Wid wasn’t allowed to be at the, uh, the Bracey farm. So he asks my Uncle Lacey, which is Rena’s father, to go get Abby and bring her to where they could go to Elizabethtown, Illinois, to get married.  And after they got married why, uh, he still wasn’t allowed to come to the Bracey f- home. And few late years after that his, Abby’s father, becomes sick and, uh, Wilford was, uh, working for my grandfather shuckin’ corn and he um, ‘E — Abby went down and said to my grandfather Jack Thomas, said, uh, “Dad said Wid could come home.” The reason was because they needed somebody to shuck corn and that was, uh, way to, uh, get the corn out.  And, uh, Mr. Bracey was, um, also, uh, that was, uh, that was a way to get, uh, the daughter’s husband back in the family again. We have two sons and they’re always, uh, wantin’ to do something to put their mother and daddy in the bright lights. And, uh, so, uh, we were going, our fortieth wedding anniversary, we were going to, uh, go to the Kentucky Lake, and, uh, our two sons, and one of them is married, and his wife, to stay all night and eat. And, uh, so, uh, we had, uh, one of our best friends had lost one of their parents, so we went the opposite way to get to, uh, the Kentucky Lake, just to the wake, and, uh, after that was over why we came back and stopped in our hometown to, uh, see an art exhibit, not knowing that the art exhibit wasn’t even going on. But we were told by our two sons that it was, and when we got there at Fowey Hall, there was a hundred and twenty-five of our friends were there for our wor- fortieth wedding anniversary.  And uh, after the ex- … being shocked so much, why, we enjoyed all the rest of the activities.

TRANSCRIBED BY: Natalie Boccumini and Sandra Lindberg

DATE OF TRANSCRIPTION (DD/MM/YYYY): 29/03/2008

PHONETIC TRANSCRIPTION OF UNSCRIPTED SPEECH: N/A

TRANSCRIBED BY: N/A

DATE OF TRANSCRIPTION (DD/MM/YYYY): N/A

SCHOLARLY COMMENTARY: N/A

COMMENTARY BY: N/A

DATE OF COMMENTARY (DD/MM/YYYY): N/A

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