New York 26

Both as a courtesy and to comply with copyright law, please remember to credit IDEA for direct or indirect use of samples. IDEA is a free resource; please consider supporting us.



BIOGRAPHICAL INFORMATION

AGE: 26

DATE OF BIRTH (DD/MM/YYYY): 19/05/1989

PLACE OF BIRTH: East Harlem, New York City

GENDER: female

ETHNICITY: Puerto Rican

OCCUPATION: clerical worker

EDUCATION: BA in history

AREAS OF RESIDENCE OUTSIDE REPRESENTATIVE REGION FOR LONGER THAN SIX MONTHS:

Subject was born and raised in East Harlem, New York City, until age 18, but attended college in Albany, New York, from ages 18 to 21. She moved back to East Harlem after she graduated.

OTHER INFLUENCES ON SPEECH: N/A

The text used in our recordings of scripted speech can be found by clicking here.

RECORDED BY: David Nevell

DATE OF RECORDING (DD/MM/YYYY): 08/03/2014

PHONETIC TRANSCRIPTION OF SCRIPTED SPEECH: N/A

TRANSCRIBED BY: N/A

DATE OF TRANSCRIPTION (DD/MM/YYYY): N/A

ORTHOGRAPHIC TRANSCRIPTION OF UNSCRIPTED SPEECH:

I was born in New York City. I grew up in the area, East Harlem. Well, I left when I was 18, to go to college, I went to SUNY Albany, in upstate New York. Then I came back when I finished. I was, like, 21. I’ve been here since, just working. I’ve been having different jobs here and there. Right now I’m working at the Intrepid Museum, which is, um, near like, downtown, Hell’s Kitchen area. I still live in East Harlem, yeah. I live on 105th and First Avenue, so right by the East River. It’s OK; it’s changed a lot throughout the years; um, gentrification has been, um, you know, an issue, um, so, ya know, it has its pros and cons. Um, ya know, its changed a lot, ya know, and that’s it, really.

Well, with, ya know, with people, different, um, people moving in, different real estate coming in, it’s made the neighborhood, um, it’s attracted more police security, um, for those people, those new people moving in; um, also, uh, it’s created different, um, I guess, economic, um, ya know, like they put a mall on 116th, ya know, which helps a lot, ya know; you don’t have to go so far now, like there’s different stores that we didn’t have access to before that now are close by, like, Target, the first Target in Manhattan, PetSmart, that kind of thing. Um, prices have gone up a little bit in terms of like rent, things like that.

I like animals a lot, um, human-rights causes, things like that. I wanna be a police officer, so like, I — right now I’m in the process of getting into that. So, ya know, like helping people, that kinda stuff, volunteer work. I was in, uh, um, I was in a fraternity when I was in college; it was a community-service fraternity that their focus was about that kinda stuff. I guess, like, growing up, I know what it’s like, um, to not have a lot, so, you know, it’s good to see, ya know, people giving, like, it’s good to give, especially when, like, if you’re in the other side, ya know, you feel good when they give to you, that kinda thing.

Born here, my mom was born here, but, like, my grandparents are from Puerto Rico. My dad was born in Chicago, but he grew up in Puerto Rico, and then he came back here.

I graduated with a B.A. in history. Right now, I’m, a, um, museu- box-office representative at the Intrepid Museum — Intrepid Sea, Air, and Space Museum.

TRANSCRIBED BY: Shawnia Keith (under supervision of David Nevell)

DATE OF TRANSCRIPTION (DD/MM/YYYY): 03/05/2014

PHONETIC TRANSCRIPTION OF UNSCRIPTED SPEECH: N/A

TRANSCRIBED BY: N/A

DATE OF TRANSCRIPTION (DD/MM/YYYY): N/A

SCHOLARLY COMMENTARY: N/A

COMMENTARY BY: N/A

DATE OF COMMENTARY (DD/MM/YYYY): N/A

The archive provides:

  • Recordings of accent/dialect speakers from the region you select.
  • Text of the speakers’ biographical details.
  • Scholarly commentary and analysis in some cases.
  • In most cases, an orthographic transcription of the speakers’ unscripted speech.  In a small number of cases, you will also find a narrow phonetic transcription of the sample (see Phonetic Transcriptions for a complete list).  The recordings average four minutes in length and feature both the reading of one of two standard passages, and some unscripted speech. The two passages are Comma Gets a Cure (currently our standard passage) and The Rainbow Passage (used in our earliest recordings).

For instructional materials or coaching in the accents and dialects represented here, please go to Other Dialect Services.