New York 8

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BIOGRAPHICAL INFORMATION

AGE: 57

DATE OF BIRTH (DD/MM/YYYY): 09/23/1943

PLACE OF BIRTH: New York City (the Bronx)

GENDER: female

ETHNICITY: Jewish

OCCUPATION: real estate agent

EDUCATION: high school

AREA(S) OF RESIDENCE OUTSIDE REPRESENTATIVE REGION FOR LONGER THAN SIX MONTHS:

Subject has lived in Greenwich, Connecticut; Chicago, Illinois; and Interlochen, Michigan.

OTHER INFLUENCES ON SPEECH: N/A

The text used in our recordings of scripted speech can be found by clicking here.

RECORDED BY: Alexandra Goodman

DATE OF RECORDING (DD/MM/YYYY): 15/10/2000

PHONETIC TRANSCRIPTION OF SCRIPTED SPEECH: N/A

TRANSCRIBED BY: N/A

DATE OF TRANSCRIPTION (DD/MM/YYYY): N/A

ORTHOGRAPHIC TRANSCRIPTION OF UNSCRIPTED SPEECH:

We grew up in, uh, 66 W. Gunhill Road, right across the street from a beautiful golf course, so we had a golf course on one side and a, um, park on the other. My brother and I were very close growing up. Um, we used to do a lot of things together. We used to play in the house; we would make up stories and poems and all kinds of fun stuff. And my dad — my mother worked — and on Sunday my dad used to take us — every Sunday we would pick a place to go and we would go and have the day, my brother, my dad, and I. And one, one, one Sunday we’d go ice skating, we’d go up to Bear Mountains and we would ice skate up in Bear Mountains and that was a lot of fun. And then another Sunday my dad would take us downtown, and we’d go see a movie that was playing at the Paramont Theatre, or another Sunday we’d go to the Bronx Zoo and we’d kinda have fun doing that. And one Sund- … Every, actually each week one of would get a choice, we would pick, who would go where, and where … whoever picked the choice, that’s where we would go and we were pretty good about that. And we used to have a great time and it was a lot of fun. And it’s interesting because as … I got married and I had two children; I have a son or a daughter; we used to do the same thing: every Sunday, we would pick … Ali or John would get to pick where they would like to go for a, um, a Sunday.

TRANSCRIBED BY: Jacqueline Baker and Eric Armstrong

DATE OF TRANSCRIPTION (DD/MM/YYYY): 05/10/2007

PHONETIC TRANSCRIPTION OF UNSCRIPTED SPEECH: N/A

TRANSCRIBED BY: N/A

DATE OF TRANSCRIPTION (DD/MM/YYYY): N/A

SCHOLARLY COMMENTARY:

Note the following features: a light Bronx/Jewish dialect; no R-coloring on -er endings (“mirror, other, lawyer, mother”), though R-coloring creeps in before a pause; linking R (“My brother and I”); strong R on -AIR -OR (“Sarah, Perry, Square, rare,” and “force”); stressed ER vowels with R-coloring (begins with sound in “hut”, as in “Reversed, Nurse, earlier, her, were”); strong rounding (and a slight offglide) on the AW vowel (“office, thought, strong, cost, daughter”); final Schwa NOT like “hut” (“Comma: resists intrusive R, Polo: almost sounds like Polar); -eye diphthong very bright (begins with ash, as in “right side”); -OW diphthong very twangy (begins with ash, as in “bear Mountains”); -Oh diphthong begins unrounded (begins with hut, as in “Old, go”; ash before double R (“Harrison”); Yod Dropping (“tune”); -y endings with onglide (“movie”); and intermediate A (onglide into ash, as in “bath”). Also note upward inflections, particularly when listing things at the beginning.

COMMENTARY BY: Eric Armstrong

DATE OF COMMENTARY (DD/MM/YYYY): N/A

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