North Carolina 1

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BIOGRAPHICAL INFORMATION

AGE: 30s

DATE OF BIRTH (DD/MM/YYYY): 1960s

PLACE OF BIRTH: Outer Banks, North Carolina

GENDER: male

ETHNICITY: Caucasian

OCCUPATION: builder, restorer of historic homes

EDUCATION: N/A

AREA(S) OF RESIDENCE OUTSIDE REPRESENTATIVE REGION FOR LONGER THAN SIX MONTHS:

Subject is originally from Englehard, fifty miles away on the other side of the Sound from Manteo, where he was recorded. (Despite being from the other side of the Sound, his dialect is very strong and a superb example of Outer Banks speech.)

OTHER INFLUENCES ON SPEECH: N/A

The text used in our recordings of scripted speech can be found by clicking here.

RECORDED BY: Paul Meier

DATE OF RECORDING (DD/MM/YYYY): 1999

PHONETIC TRANSCRIPTION OF SCRIPTED SPEECH: N/A

TRANSCRIBED BY: N/A

DATE OF TRANSCRIPTION (DD/MM/YYYY): N/A

ORTHOGRAPHIC TRANSCRIPTION OF UNSCRIPTED SPEECH:

… Englehard and, uh, grew up down there for 28 years. Worked over here ‘fore after I started workin’ and drove back and forth, and then I moved over here at age 28, and I been here ever since. Down in Hyde county Englehard it’s real slow, laid-back, you know, country, and over here it’s wide open you know and … Be involved of [unclear] uh, old high school, so we had to remodel the front part of it and redo it. And then the back part was so close to the ground we dug out underneath of it so we’d have clearance underneath and remodeled it back to a historical state. All original, no trim- you know, you know the corners and everything so put her back to original. I had it a, uh, milled in Currituck right across the bridge in Currituck County. The guy has a mill there; he milled it all for me. Window trim, floor trim, the whole works, it’s all from Currituck. Like we got on our own island cause they sell those trees and all you know. Down there on the, uh, Corolla light … down there you know, no Currituck light it is, instead of Corolla, it’s Currituck light, they sell. Done a bunch a’ that and done the Roanoke Island Inn for John Wilson and all a his stuff that he’s been doing for the last, so many years I do it all for him. He’s my main employer, you know he, he keeps me employed the most of it. At the Currituck light, the old part of the building, the, the old keeper’s house cause it was it was felled down, and we went back in the back and find old hand rails and everything. It was the, like the keeper’s house at the lighthouse, at the at the Currituck lighthouse, which now has a gift shop run by the, uh, Eddie Green, and it’s a Christmas shop but it’s – it’s neat inside. And this one here this has been a real probably about the best job I ever had as far as I, uh – using the original wood you know, matching the real wood all the way through it. ‘Cause a lot of times they come in and put sheet rock and he’s done wood all the way. With the Outer Banks like you say, the islan(d) you know, the as far as people comin’ out here you can go fishing any time you want to just bout and catch fish in the sound or the ocean, either one. In the ocean you catch tuna and dolphin and all that; you can’t catch them in the sound; you catch croakers and trout and flounder and stuff like that in the sound. You got all these local lakes that you can bass fish is all freshwater; you got bass and crappie and catfish and all that stuff you can catch, you know, so you got a mixture by your own island itself. But in the sound, when the other side of the island the Pamlico Sound part of it, that’s when it gets deep. But yeah, that, that little place in there you go through is shallow. Well you got Wanchese and Manns Harbor and, uh, Colington Harbor – is, uh, like a little island parts you know. All I know they come in on a boat you know caught a boat down to Englehard here or a place called Nebraska [unclear] that’s where a lot of old boats used to, used to be like a harbor that there they come into, and that’s where they started from right there, coming there …

TRANSCRIBED BY: Katie Walley

DATE OF TRANSCRIPTION (DD/MM/YYYY): 02/04/2008

PHONETIC TRANSCRIPTION OF UNSCRIPTED SPEECH: N/A

TRANSCRIBED BY: N/A

DATE OF TRANSCRIPTION (DD/MM/YYYY): N/A

SCHOLARLY COMMENTARY: N/A

COMMENTARY BY: N/A

DATE OF COMMENTARY (DD/MM/YYYY): N/A

The archive provides:

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