Ohio 6

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BIOGRAPHICAL INFORMATION

AGE: 21

DATE OF BIRTH (DD/MM/YYYY): N/A

PLACE OF BIRTH: Cincinnati, Ohio

GENDER: female

ETHNICITY: Caucasian

OCCUPATION: Subject has worked as a janitor and a pizza-delivery employee.

EDUCATION: some high school studies

AREA(S) OF RESIDENCE OUTSIDE REPRESENTATIVE REGION FOR LONGER THAN SIX MONTHS:

Subject mentions leaving Cincinnati during high school, but she does not say where she moved.

OTHER INFLUENCES ON SPEECH: N/A

The text used in our recordings of scripted speech can be found by clicking here.

RECORDED BY: Geoffrey Knox

DATE OF RECORDING (DD/MM/YYYY): N/A

PHONETIC TRANSCRIPTION OF SCRIPTED SPEECH: N/A

TRANSCRIBED BY: N/A

DATE OF TRANSCRIPTION (DD/MM/YYYY): N/A

ORTHOGRAPHIC TRANSCRIPTION OF UNSCRIPTED SPEECH:

Cincinnati is big. It’s bigger than any city I’ve ever been to (um) or lived in. I know, there’s lotsa hicks in Cincinnati too. An’ my first house, that I was born at, there was a pig farm, down the road, an’ it stunk real bad. And (uh) — an’ then (uh) I moved, an’ then we moved again, in Cincinnati. And, an’ then I moved to the inner city, an’ that was — That was fine, until the riots broke out. An’ I wasn’t livin’ there when that happened, but my sister was and (uh) … I dunno. Ev’rybody’s car got smashed and (uh) ev’rything like that. Y’ know, it was a bad time. That was, like, y’ know, last year. Las’ March. Well, I went to pre-school, so that was the first one. That was, like, y’ know, the YMCA or whatever. An’ then my mom made me go to kindergarten with her, even though I wasn’t s’pposed to be in kindergarten yet. An’ my friends were all [unclear] at the school an’ [unclear]. That’s about the only thing I remember. [Giggling] An’ then (um) I went to another place, called Wilson and (um) … They — I dunno. I went there, an’ then I had to go back to my mom’s school ’cause she wanted me to have Catholic background. But I hated it an’ so I went back to the public school. (Uh) I went to high school, and I didn’t like high school. And so I left Cincinnati. I worked at Domino’s. [Interviewer: For how long?] An’ — Oh, on an’ off , for a year or two. I delivered pizzas. Yup, that wasn’ fun. Nah. I worked at a vet. An’ that wasn’ fun. That was a really gross job. [Interviewer: What’d you do?] I cleaned up. Well, I could tell you the grossest thing about the vet. [Interviewer: OK.] Well, there were two gro– two grossest parts. Three, OK. First one is when you put the animals to sleep, they crap an’ pee all over themselves an’ ev’rything. An’ then you have to put ’em in a bag, an’ then you ha’ put a tag on it, an’ then put ’em in the freezer in the bag till the people come an’ get ’em. It’s really gross. [Laughing] An’ then, the second grossest thing is (um) this tumor that I had — they took it off a dog an’ (uh) — It was about as big as, like, a gallon of milk. It was — an’ I had to pick it up with this other girl. We just took all these, like, utensils with it, an’ carry it and put it in a bag and put it into the freezer, ’cause the bio-hazard people come an’ take all that stuff away. Third grossest thing is (um) — was — when they would do, like, abortions on cats, an’ dogs, an’ they’d be — all be in their, like, sacs an’ stuff. An’ you’d have to put those in a bag too. An’ then there’s the stool samples y’ had to mix up the stuff. Yeah, that was really gross.

TRANSCRIBED BY: Jacqueline Baker

DATE OF TRANSCRIPTION (DD/MM/YYYY): 25/07/2008

PHONETIC TRANSCRIPTION OF UNSCRIPTED SPEECH: N/A

TRANSCRIBED BY: N/A

DATE OF TRANSCRIPTION (DD/MM/YYYY): N/A

SCHOLARLY COMMENTARY:

Subject provides a great example of someone whose speech does not reflect characteristics from neighboring areas, in this case, northern Kentucky, directly across the Ohio River from Cincinnati. Rather, she is representative of the general Ohio patterns described in Ohio 1 and 2.

COMMENTARY BY: Geoffrey Knox

DATE OF COMMENTARY (DD/MM/YYYY): N/A

The archive provides:

  • Recordings of accent/dialect speakers from the region you select.
  • Text of the speakers’ biographical details.
  • Scholarly commentary and analysis in some cases.
  • In most cases, an orthographic transcription of the speakers’ unscripted speech.  In a small number of cases, you will also find a narrow phonetic transcription of the sample (see Phonetic Transcriptions for a complete list).  The recordings average four minutes in length and feature both the reading of one of two standard passages, and some unscripted speech. The two passages are Comma Gets a Cure (currently our standard passage) and The Rainbow Passage (used in our earliest recordings).

 

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