Oklahoma 10

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BIOGRAPHICAL INFORMATION

AGE: 52

DATE OF BIRTH (DD/MM/YYYY): 1956

PLACE OF BIRTH: Shawnee, Oklahoma

GENDER: female

ETHNICITY: Caucasian

OCCUPATION: creative designer

EDUCATION: high school diploma

AREA(S) OF RESIDENCE OUTSIDE REPRESENTATIVE REGION FOR LONGER THAN SIX MONTHS:

Subject has lived in Key West, Florida; and Santa Fe, New Mexico.

OTHER INFLUENCES ON SPEECH:

Subject designs Western/Cowboy/Outlaw-inspired jewelry, clothing, and accessories at a gallery in the Paseo District of Oklahoma City. Also, she was close to a grandmother who was born and raised in Kentucky.

The text used in our recordings of scripted speech can be found by clicking here.

RECORDED BY: Ben Corbett

DATE OF RECORDING (DD/MM/YYYY): 20/06/2009

PHONETIC TRANSCRIPTION OF SCRIPTED SPEECH: N/A

TRANSCRIBED BY: N/A

DATE OF TRANSCRIPTION (DD/MM/YYYY): N/A

ORTHOGRAPHIC TRANSCRIPTION OF UNSCRIPTED SPEECH:

[Hammering sound is from leather construction in other room.]  I t-take a blank belt buckle that I order offline, and I spray paint it black. And then, but before I do that, I collect from flea markets and garage sales and stuff, uh, used, broken, vintage, uh, jewelry. And I … after I paint them up, I glue all the jewelry on the, uh, buckle. And then I just glue the pieces on the buckle. And then I also add James’ little dead Okies on the buckle. And then he pours a mixture on top, and then I take them, and I sell them for a lot of money. And then I take, uh, cut up old cowboy belts and James puts a snap on them and then I take, uh, paints and I paint the tooling. And these are vintage. They’re really old, and when I paint them, it just brings out a really cool fullness to the tooling. And, er, so whoever wears them, uh, was wearing the spirit of an old cowgirl, cowboy. And then it’s got my spirit in them. So, we call it the Bone Dust, Bone Dust, Oklahoma. [Subject reads from an original poem about Bone Dust, Oklahoma.] Where in the world is Bone Dust, Oklahoma? Don’t bother pulling out the official state map of Oklahoma to find Bone Dust. There is no zip code and no state highway cutting a path through it. Bone Dust is not a place. It is a state of mind. Go deep within yourself, deeper than your gut to the very core of who you are. Along the way, you’ll see the heartaches and trials, pains, and suffering. Upon, uh, arrival at your destination, you will find strength and second chances. Not everyone will go to Bone Dust, but that’s just as well because it’s not for the faint of heart. The rewards for your journey are unique, edgy, and gut-inspired, a true likeness of the one who first discovered this mysterious place: the Bone Dust Cowgirl.

TRANSCRIBED BY: Ben Corbett

DATE OF TRANSCRIPTION (DD/MM/YYYY): 20/06/2009

PHONETIC TRANSCRIPTION OF UNSCRIPTED SPEECH: N/A

TRANSCRIBED BY: N/A

DATE OF TRANSCRIPTION (DD/MM/YYYY): N/A

SCHOLARLY COMMENTARY:

Medial “r” can eclipse a following syllable that ends with “r” consonant (mirror). Ending “d” and “t” often drops. Beginning plosive consonants, such as “d” and “g,” are very strong, muscled. Medial “t” drops (vintage). “ʃ” inserts into the consonant blend “str,” forming “shtr.” The “g” on -ing endings is dropped. “u” vowel (zoo) lengthens and is preceded by a schwa, “ə.” “u” is also nasal. Notice the “æ” sound in nasal as well. Short vowels “ɪ” (kit) and “ɛ” (get) lengthen and receive additional stress. The diphthong “eɪ” (paint) becomes the diphthong “aɪ.” The diphthong “aɪ” (time) becomes the “ɑ” sound (father). Finally, the diphthong “oʊ” (don’t) lengthens and approaches the diphthong “aʊ.”

COMMENTARY BY: Ben Corbett

DATE OF COMMENTARY (DD/MM/YYYY): 20/06/2009

The archive provides:

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