Oklahoma 12

Both as a courtesy and to comply with copyright law, please remember to credit IDEA for direct or indirect use of samples.  IDEA is a free resource; please consider supporting us.


BIOGRAPHICAL INFORMATION

AGE: 40

DATE OF BIRTH (DD/MM/YYYY): 09/09/1969

PLACE OF BIRTH: Jacksonville, Florida

GENDER: female

ETHNICITY: Caucasian

OCCUPATION: office manager

EDUCATION: high school diploma

AREA(S) OF RESIDENCE OUTSIDE REPRESENTATIVE REGION FOR LONGER THAN SIX MONTHS:

Subject was born in Florida and lived in Houston, Texas, until the age of 10, when she moved to Duncan, Oklahoma, where she still resides.

OTHER INFLUENCES ON SPEECH: N/A

The text used in our recordings of scripted speech can be found by clicking here.

RECORDED BY: Ben Corbett

DATE OF RECORDING (DD/MM/YYYY): 09/08/2010

PHONETIC TRANSCRIPTION OF SCRIPTED SPEECH: N/A

TRANSCRIBED BY: N/A

DATE OF TRANSCRIPTION (DD/MM/YYYY): N/A

ORTHOGRAPHIC TRANSCRIPTION OF UNSCRIPTED SPEECH:

Oh, that crazy fat chick in that zebra dress at TapWerks: [chuckles] She was so extra large, which I don’t have anything against extra-large women, but, and her butt was real big too. Really, really, really big. But, when you dress like that, and go out in public, where people are [chuckles] and you have to adjust your breast every five minutes because they’re hanging down to your belly button, that is ridiculous. And, to be hanging on every man [chuckles] around her, kissing on one, pressing on another, it was pretty gross. But, just a word of advice, if you got any class at all, wear a dress that covers your ass, oh, excuse me, your rear end, that conceals your breasts that hang to your knees and put a bra on before you go out in public. And, pick one man to caress on, to kiss on, and that’s all I have to say about it. [chuckles]  I have a beef. And, this is very, very serious. I have a problem with, um, picture texts. It really, really irritates me for men who send picture texts via their phone to other men, especially married men, of naked women, half-dressed women, disgusting features of women. And so if anyone out there is listening to this and has any respect for their mother, or their wife, or their daughters, don’t send that trash over the text phone. That’s all I have to say.

TRANSCRIBED BY: Ben Corbett

DATE OF TRANSCRIPTION (DD/MM/YYYY): 09/08/2010

PHONETIC TRANSCRIPTION OF UNSCRIPTED SPEECH: N/A

TRANSCRIBED BY: N/A

DATE OF TRANSCRIPTION (DD/MM/YYYY): N/A

SCHOLARLY COMMENTARY:

Nasalization is very strong in this accent. The “aɪ” diphthong (private) loses its second vowel, and nasalizes. The “ɪ” sound (district) approaches a nasal “i” sound. The “u” sound (zoo) is also nasal, and is preceded by a schwa, “ə.” The short “ɛ” sound (men) changes to an “ɪ” sound. Occasionally, the intermediate “a” sound (can’t) becomes the diphthong “eɪ” (stay).  The “r” sound is almost always hard and lengthened, and often overpowers a preceding vowel. Ending “t” and “k” sounds are often dropped. Medial “t” either becomes “d” or is dropped. Words that begin with “h” and are in an unstressed position in a sentence drop the beginning “h.” “Her” becomes “’er.” The short “ɛ” sound (men) becomes a diphthong “eɪ” (stay) in the word “measure.” The word “picture” becomes “pitcher.” When emphasized with feeling, the word “man” becomes a two-syllable word (MA-in, almost MA-yin). Notice that a “ʒ” (measure) sound links “conceals” and “your” –“concealszhyer.” Also, the phrase “bra on” becomes one word with no glottal stop separating the two words (“braon”). The “ɔ” sound in the word “thought” becomes the diphthong “oʊ” (blow).

COMMENTARY BY: Ben Corbett

DATE OF COMMENTARY (DD/MM/YYYY): 09/08/2010

The archive provides:

  • Recordings of accent/dialect speakers from the region you select.
  • Text of the speakers’ biographical details.
  • Scholarly commentary and analysis in some cases.
  • In most cases, an orthographic transcription of the speakers’ unscripted speech.  In a small number of cases, you will also find a narrow phonetic transcription of the sample (see Phonetic Transcriptions for a complete list).  The recordings average four minutes in length and feature both the reading of one of two standard passages, and some unscripted speech. The two passages are Comma Gets a Cure (currently our standard passage) and The Rainbow Passage (used in our earliest recordings).

 

For instructional materials or coaching in the accents and dialects represented here, please go to Other Dialect Services.