Ontario 3

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BIOGRAPHICAL INFORMATION

AGE: 49

DATE OF BIRTH (DD/MM/YYYY): 1956

PLACE OF BIRTH: Sarnia, Ontario, Canada

GENDER: male

ETHNICITY: Caucasian

OCCUPATION: farmer

EDUCATION: N/A

AREA(S) OF RESIDENCE OUTSIDE REPRESENTATIVE REGION FOR LONGER THAN SIX MONTHS:

Subject was born and has lived in the same area all his life.

OTHER INFLUENCES ON SPEECH:

He very rarely visits the city. (The nearest one is Toronto.) Therefore, his accent would probably be a good sample for rural south Canada, as it is quite broad and has the typical Canadian rising tone.

The text used in our recordings of scripted speech can be found by clicking here.

RECORDED BY: Geraldine Cook

DATE OF RECORDING (DD/MM/YYYY): 2005

PHONETIC TRANSCRIPTION OF SCRIPTED SPEECH: N/A

TRANSCRIBED BY: N/A

DATE OF TRANSCRIPTION (DD/MM/YYYY): N/A

ORTHOGRAPHIC TRANSCRIPTION OF UNSCRIPTED SPEECH:

Yeah, I grew up in Point Edward, and it was a, a small village where a lot of people were familiar with each other, and there was a good sports program, and I played hockey, like everybody knew everybody, but, uh, being the times in the 60s, it was, uh, it was, uh, I was able to live more, more of a country life because it was open spaces and most of the places that we played were in ditches and in wooded areas, climbing trees and chasing birds and that kind of thing, so I really felt blessed that I was able to, to live that kind of life as a boy, as a boy should. That is right where the bridges cross the, the St. Claire River, where we took, remember you were taking pictures, the snowstorm, well that’s Point Edward. It’s a village, and it’s totally surrounded by Sarnia, but Point Edward’s never gonna grow. It’s defined that’s it. [Interviewer speaks.] It’s in Ontario, Canada, and it uh, uh, y’know … we had swimming places like the yacht club; there was a cove there where we always swam when we were kids. We could swim in the river when we were old enough and were strong enough to swim, and, y’know if you liked fish, there were always places to go fish. There was so much adventure, adventure. So, uh, over the years everything got developed and just, y’know, it’s just the way the land, if there’s a vacant piece of property, somebody’s gonna put a house on it; somebody’s gonna put a store there; somebody’s gonna make it a parking lot, and I felt uh, when it was my turn to raise a family, I want my son to be able to … and my daughter, whatever, to be able to, to have a country-type life, to, to be on the farm, to be able to play, and be outside, and come home dirty and cut up and just whatever, just, just go out and live just have so much fun. And when, uh, when it came time to, to find a place, y’know, we ended up out in the country; now where we live and, and where the kids grew up is Wyoming, Ontario, which is 15 minutes where I grew up, and, uh, it’s uh, it’s, it’s a nice little community. I’m not, not in the town; I’m outside the town ’bout 7 kilometers, and that’s where the kids went to school, and that’s where all their friends are, and, and uh, y’know, they’ve had, I think they’ve had a pretty good life, being out in the country.

TRANSCRIBED BY: Faith Harvey

DATE OF TRANSCRIPTION (DD/MM/YYYY): 19/07/2008

PHONETIC TRANSCRIPTION OF UNSCRIPTED SPEECH: N/A

TRANSCRIBED BY: N/A

DATE OF TRANSCRIPTION (DD/MM/YYYY): N/A

SCHOLARLY COMMENTARY: N/A

COMMENTARY BY: N/A

DATE OF COMMENTARY (DD/MM/YYYY): N/A

The archive provides:

  • Recordings of accent/dialect speakers from the region you select.
  • Text of the speakers’ biographical details.
  • Scholarly commentary and analysis in some cases.
  • In most cases, an orthographic transcription of the speakers’ unscripted speech.  In a small number of cases, you will also find a narrow phonetic transcription of the sample (see Phonetic Transcriptions for a complete list).  The recordings average four minutes in length and feature both the reading of one of two standard passages, and some unscripted speech. The two passages are Comma Gets a Cure (currently our standard passage) and The Rainbow Passage (used in our earliest recordings).

 

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