Saudi Arabia 7

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BIOGRAPHICAL INFORMATION

AGE: 25

DATE OF BIRTH (DD/MM/YYYY): 15/01/1991

PLACE OF BIRTH: Jeddah

GENDER: female

ETHNICITY: Arabic/Saudi Arabian

OCCUPATION: student

EDUCATION: one semester of college

AREA(S) OF RESIDENCE OUTSIDE REPRESENTATIVE REGION FOR LONGER THAN SIX MONTHS:

Subject spent 10 months in Michigan, in the United States.

OTHER INFLUENCES ON SPEECH:

She studied English for five years in Jeddah, Saudi Arabia, and spent 10 months studying English language in the United States.

The text used in our recordings of scripted speech can be found by clicking here.

RECORDED BY: Deric McNish

DATE OF RECORDING (DD/MM/YYYY): 09/02/2016

PHONETIC TRANSCRIPTION OF SCRIPTED SPEECH: N/A

TRANSCRIBED BY: N/A

DATE OF TRANSCRIPTION (DD/MM/YYYY): N/A

ORTHOGRAPHIC TRANSCRIPTION OF UNSCRIPTED SPEECH:

I’m from Jeddah. I thinks Jeddah — it’s, uhm, more freedom. I don’t know why, but it’s have a lot of activities there, and more people are more opening than the other. Totally it’s different because different tradition. So in Saudi Arabia we have to — not freedom that much — so we have to wear like an hijab and turban, so here it’s more freedom. In Saudi Arabia, we didn’t drive a car, and here we can drive a car. So, yeah, it’s different so we can go whatever you want and anytime you can go. Like in Saudi Arabia, you have a time so because here and Saudi Arabia different between girls and boys. Here it’s everyone the same. So, yeah, it’s different and different between ages. So in Saudi Arabia, whatever your age, if you’re not married so you have to stay in your, sit in your house with your family. And here, in age 18, so you have to be freedom. Yeah, every pla- ever-every restaurant in Saudi Arabia, it’s separate. But we can sit like a family, but if you just go like a man they have a separate place, so you can go with your family and like your husband, your brother, your father — that’s my opinion.

Uhm, I’m married. It’s kind of something — its different, uhm, because it’s different from our culture and traditional. So I know his, uh, his sister. We are together in the beach. I saw her every weekend, and I never met my husband before. So she called my sister, and she told her that I want to — my brother get engaged to your sister, and I never saw him. I called him two weeks before I got engaged, and after that I got engaged. I called — I told my mother. In Arabic … [subject speaks in Arabic] grand cappuccino. Like, excuse me, I want grand cappuccino. Yeah, thank you so much. [Subject speaks in Arabic.] Thank you so much. And good job.

TRANSCRIBED BY: Ryan Duda

DATE OF TRANSCRIPTION (DD/MM/YYYY): 15/02/2016

PHONETIC TRANSCRIPTION OF UNSCRIPTED SPEECH: N/A

TRANSCRIBED BY: N/A

DATE OF TRANSCRIPTION (DD/MM/YYYY): N/A

SCHOLARLY COMMENTARY:

The subject’s mispronunciation of several words in Comma Gets a Cure is due to her lack of knowledge of English, not necessarily her accent.

COMMENTARY BY: Cameron Meier

DATE OF COMMENTARY (DD/MM/YYYY): 02/16/2016

The archive provides:

  • Recordings of accent/dialect speakers from the region you select.
  • Text of the speakers’ biographical details.
  • Scholarly commentary and analysis in some cases.
  • In most cases, an orthographic transcription of the speakers’ unscripted speech.  In a small number of cases, you will also find a narrow phonetic transcription of the sample (see Phonetic Transcriptions for a complete list).  The recordings average four minutes in length and feature both the reading of one of two standard passages, and some unscripted speech. The two passages are Comma Gets a Cure (currently our standard passage) and The Rainbow Passage (used in our earliest recordings).

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