Tennessee 3

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BIOGRAPHICAL INFORMATION

AGE: 54

DATE OF BIRTH (DD/MM/YYYY): 1947

PLACE OF BIRTH: Madison, Tennessee

GENDER: male

ETHNICITY: Caucasian

OCCUPATION: N/A

EDUCATION: N/A

AREA(S) OF RESIDENCE OUTSIDE REPRESENTATIVE REGION FOR LONGER THAN SIX MONTHS:

Subject lived for 18 months in Fulton, Kentucky.

OTHER INFLUENCES ON SPEECH: N/A

The text used in our recordings of scripted speech can be found by clicking here.

RECORDED BY: Patricia Childs

DATE OF RECORDING (DD/MM/YYYY): 08/06/2001

PHONETIC TRANSCRIPTION OF SCRIPTED SPEECH: N/A

TRANSCRIBED BY: N/A

DATE OF TRANSCRIPTION (DD/MM/YYYY): N/A

ORTHOGRAPHIC TRANSCRIPTION OF UNSCRIPTED SPEECH:

One Christmas — it was probably 12 or 13 years old — I got a bow n’ arrow for Christmas. An’ I had a bunch of uncles who were fireworks nuts [laughing], and they would always blow somethin’ up — Thanksgiving, Christmas, anytime they got together. So that Christmas they, uh, decided they would see how high they could shoot a cherry bomb, [laughing] an’ they blew up all my arrows on Christmas Day; I never shot a one. My dad was not too happy about that — he wan’t one of ‘em — he was a little put out with ‘em, to say the least. But they were quite a strange bunch. They would just strap one on to the end of the — end of the arrow — with tape, and then they’d jus’ draw back, an’ somebody would light it, and then they’d let it go. They had a lot a’ things they would do with fireworks. They had a pipe they would stick in the ground. Then they would take a cherry bomb — now back then cherry bombs were pretty explosive — [laughing] an’ one of ‘em would hold the cherry bomb, one of ‘m would light it, another’n would s — would drive a stob — tha — you know, they’d drop the cherry bomb down into the pipe, somebody would drive a stob down into the pipe, then they’d put a tin can over it, and then they’d blow it off n’ just see how high; they’d do that for hours. It’s a wonder nobody been killed, but as far as I know, nuh, nobody was ever hurt.

TRANSCRIBED BY: Sandra Lindberg

DATE OF TRANSCRIPTION (DD/MM/YYYY): 22/04/2008

PHONETIC TRANSCRIPTION OF UNSCRIPTED SPEECH: N/A

TRANSCRIBED BY: N/A

DATE OF TRANSCRIPTION (DD/MM/YYYY): N/A

SCHOLARLY COMMENTARY: N/A

COMMENTARY BY: N/A

DATE OF COMMENTARY (DD/MM/YYYY): N/A

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