Trinidad 3

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BIOGRAPHICAL INFORMATION

AGE: 52

DATE OF BIRTH (DD/MM/YYYY): 1956

PLACE OF BIRTH: Sangre Grande, Trinidad

GENDER: female

ETHNICITY: African-Chinese Trinidadian

OCCUPATION: destination services coordinator

EDUCATION: secondary education and military school

AREA(S) OF RESIDENCE OUTSIDE REPRESENTATIVE REGION FOR LONGER THAN SIX MONTHS:

Subject has never left Trinidad.

OTHER INFLUENCES ON SPEECH:

Subject was raised in Caroni, Trinidad.

The text used in our recordings of scripted speech can be found by clicking here.

RECORDED BY: Tanera Marshall

DATE OF RECORDING (DD/MM/YYYY): 25/03/2005

PHONETIC TRANSCRIPTION OF SCRIPTED SPEECH: N/A

TRANSCRIBED BY: N/A

DATE OF TRANSCRIPTION (DD/MM/YYYY): N/A

ORTHOGRAPHIC TRANSCRIPTION OF UNSCRIPTED SPEECH:

Callilloo: That is one of our national dishes. So to make callilloo, you have to get leaves of the dasheen plant, a plant that sends up the — it is a tuber? That’s what they call it — that sends its leaves above the ground. So you cut the very young leaves (they’re rolled up when they’re young). You cut the very young leaves — and you have to cut that up in very small pieces and we use ochroes to about 15 leaves of the calli- of the dasheen bush plant (we would use about 10 ochroes or so).  We put a piece of pumpkin and seasonings, Creole seasonings they call it. We put onion, garlic, chive, celery, sweet peppers into the pot and — I mentioned before — a piece of pumpkin, and we would leave it to simmer. When it’s almost done we would add perhaps a cup or two of coconut milk.  We’d grate the coconut — the dried coconut — and squeeze the milk out and then we’d put that coconut milk into the pot, cover it, and leave it to simmer. At the end of it we put salt to taste and we swizzle it (we don’t use a blender). There’s a little stick that we — that is made, people make it locally, and it has say about 4 or 5 prongs, and we would turn the stick to the left and right until (we call it “swizzlin’ the callilloo”) until the leaves are all mashed up and it’s like a very thick soup. And that callilloo is served with steamed fish and another dish that we call coo-coo that is made with corn flour. And the corn flour, we would also add coconut — it’s a very rich type of meal. And that’s it: The callilloo is served with rice and fish.

TRANSCRIBED BY: Tanera Marshall

DATE OF TRANSCRIPTION (DD/MM/YYYY): 25/03/2008

PHONETIC TRANSCRIPTION OF UNSCRIPTED SPEECH: N/A

TRANSCRIBED BY: N/A

DATE OF TRANSCRIPTION (DD/MM/YYYY): N/A

SCHOLARLY COMMENTARY: N/A

COMMENTARY BY: N/A

DATE OF COMMENTARY (DD/MM/YYYY): N/A

The archive provides:

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  • Text of the speakers’ biographical details.
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