Virginia 10

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BIOGRAPHICAL INFORMATION

AGE: 29

DATE OF BIRTH (DD/MM/YYYY): 14/04/1984

PLACE OF BIRTH: Arlington, Virginia (Washington, D.C., area)

GENDER: male

ETHNICITY: Caucasian

OCCUPATION: PhD student

EDUCATION: master’s degree in fine arts

AREAS OF RESIDENCE OUTSIDE REPRESENTATIVE REGION FOR LONGER THAN SIX MONTHS:

The subject had been living in Lawrence, Kansas, for approximately three years at the time of this recording. He previously lived in Newport News, Virginia, for four years after the age of 18, and Richmond, Virginia, for two years in his early twenties.

OTHER INFLUENCES ON SPEECH:

The speaker’s parents were both raised in Philadelphia prior to moving to Washington, D.C. The speaker is an actor and has received some vocal training to improve the quality of his speech.

The text used in our recordings of scripted speech can be found by clicking here.

RECORDED BY: Laurie Winkel (under supervision of Paul Meier)

DATE OF RECORDING (DD/MM/YYYY): 16/10/2013

PHONETIC TRANSCRIPTION OF SCRIPTED SPEECH: N/A

TRANSCRIBED BY: N/A

DATE OF TRANSCRIPTION (DD/MM/YYYY): N/A

ORTHOGRAPHIC TRANSCRIPTION OF UNSCRIPTED SPEECH:

I was born and raised in the Washington, D.C., area, uh, from the time I was born ’till I was 18. I lived in Newport News, Virginia, from the time I was 18 to the time I was 22, and Richmond, Virginia, from the time I was 22 to 24, and back to D.C. from 24 to 26; and I’ve been living in Lawrence, Kansas, since then. Uh, so primarily living in the Washington, D.C., area.

TRANSCRIBED BY: Laurie Winkel (under supervision of Paul Meier)

DATE OF TRANSCRIPTION (DD/MM/YYYY): 23/11/2013

PHONETIC TRANSCRIPTION OF UNSCRIPTED SPEECH: N/A

TRANSCRIBED BY: N/A

DATE OF TRANSCRIPTION (DD/MM/YYYY): N/A

SCHOLARLY COMMENTARY:

The speaker employs a close-mid central unrounded vowel on his first use of the word “cure,” as in /kjɘ˞/. At times, his speech shows enhanced rhoticity. He also shows a very subtle devoicing of the /d/ consonant. In contrast to the General American pronunciation of “daily,” /deɪli/, the speaker opts for a more open vowel with /dɛɫi/.

Occasionally he replaces /ɪ/ sounds with a short schwa, as in the word “lunatic.”

COMMENTARY BY: Laurie Winkel (under supervision of Paul Meier)

DATE OF COMMENTARY (DD/MM/YYYY): 23/11/2013

The archive provides:

  • Recordings of accent/dialect speakers from the region you select.
  • Text of the speakers’ biographical details.
  • Scholarly commentary and analysis in some cases.
  • In most cases, an orthographic transcription of the speakers’ unscripted speech.  In a small number of cases, you will also find a narrow phonetic transcription of the sample (see Phonetic Transcriptions for a complete list).  The recordings average four minutes in length and feature both the reading of one of two standard passages, and some unscripted speech. The two passages are Comma Gets a Cure (currently our standard passage) and The Rainbow Passage (used in our earliest recordings).

For instructional materials or coaching in the accents and dialects represented here, please go to Other Dialect Services.