Arkansas 29

Both as a courtesy and to comply with copyright law, please remember to credit IDEA for direct or indirect use of samples. IDEA is a free resource; please consider supporting us.


BIOGRAPHICAL INFORMATION

AGE: 69

DATE OF BIRTH (DD/MM/YYYY): 26/05/1950

PLACE OF BIRTH: Fayetteville, Arkansas, but grew up in Huntsville

GENDER: female

ETHNICITY: white

OCCUPATION: retired English teacher

EDUCATION: bachelor’s degree in education

AREAS OF RESIDENCE OUTSIDE REPRESENTATIVE REGION FOR LONGER THAN SIX MONTHS: none

OTHER INFLUENCES ON SPEECH:

The subject’s parents and all four grandparents were from Arkansas and lived in the area.

The text used in our recordings of scripted speech can be found by clicking here.

RECORDED BY: Ben Corbett

DATE OF RECORDING (DD/MM/YYYY): 21/02/2020

PHONETIC TRANSCRIPTION OF SCRIPTED SPEECH: N/A

TRANSCRIBED BY: N/A

DATE OF TRANSCRIPTION (DD/MM/YYYY): N/A

ORTHOGRAPHIC TRANSCRIPTION OF UNSCRIPTED SPEECH:

In the sixties, my grandmother and I were spending the afternoon together, and she said, “I really need to tell someone something, and while I already told your grandfather, that was not satisfactory to me. I really need to tell someone su-, about something that happened.”

She said, “I was out on the front porch, and a large object, which I could hear, lowered itself into the field near our home and hovered there,” she said. She went on to say she thought she was having a spell of some kind, which she never did because she was a very, uh, rational, down-to-earth human being. And she was concerned about her sanity, I believe. But she described this large object and its color and its lights and its sound and its hovering there.

Unfortunately, that was in the sixties, and I forgotten all the details of those things. But what I most remember was that she said, “Your grandfather, of course, did not believe me and interrogated me about that incident. Every time he did, I told the story a little bit differently because that’s how memory works when you take the story out the second or third or fourth or fifth time. You tweak it a little, and now I am starting to doubt myself, although I know I saw something, and it was real.”

As I said, my grandmother was a really no-nonsense kind of a woman, and I never doubted her story. But I wish I could remember it better, and I guess I really wish she were here to tell it to me again the way she saw it and the way she remembered it.

TRANSCRIBED BY: Ben Corbett

DATE OF TRANSCRIPTION (DD/MM/YYYY): 24/02/2020

PHONETIC TRANSCRIPTION OF UNSCRIPTED SPEECH: N/A

TRANSCRIBED BY: N/A

DATE OF TRANSCRIPTION (DD/MM/YYYY): N/A

SCHOLARLY COMMENTARY:

/r/ is pronounced and slightly lengthened. The vowel /e/ (DRESS) can become /ɪ/ (KIT) (then, when, object, remembered). Beginning /hw/ is pronounced (while, which). The /u/ vowel (GOOSE) is hit rather hard (duke).

The /aɪ/ diphthong (PRICE) monophtongizes, reducing the diphthong to /a/ (kind, lights, liking, fire). The /eɪ/ (FACE) diphthong, with a slightly lowered tongue, becomes /aɪ/ (PRICE) (daily, plain, ate, made face, say, way).

The /ʌ/ (STRUT) vowel sometimes replaces the first vowel in the /oʊ/ (GOAT) diphthong (so, bowl, no time) or the second vowel in the diphthong drops (owner). A schwa /ə/ (COMMA) can precede the vowel /i/ (FLEECE) (things, me, believe). Lastly, notice the pronunciation of “veterinary.”

COMMENTARY BY: Ben Corbett

DATE OF COMMENTARY (DD/MM/YYYY): 24/02/2020

The archive provides:

  • Recordings of accent/dialect speakers from the region you select.
  • Text of the speakers’ biographical details.
  • Scholarly commentary and analysis in some cases.
  • In most cases, an orthographic transcription of the speakers’ unscripted speech.  In a small number of cases, you will also find a narrow phonetic transcription of the sample (see Phonetic Transcriptions for a complete list).  The recordings average four minutes in length and feature both the reading of one of two standard passages, and some unscripted speech. The two passages are Comma Gets a Cure (currently our standard passage) and The Rainbow Passage (used in our earliest recordings).

For instructional materials or coaching in the accents and dialects represented here, please go to Other Dialect Services.