England 112

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BIOGRAPHICAL INFORMATION

AGE: 50

DATE OF BIRTH (DD/MM/YYYY): 23/10/1969

PLACE OF BIRTH: Bristol, England

GENDER: male

ETHNICITY: white British

OCCUPATION: electrician maintenance technician

EDUCATION: college

AREAS OF RESIDENCE OUTSIDE REPRESENTATIVE REGION FOR LONGER THAN SIX MONTHS:

The subject has worked all over the south UK and south Wales for weeks or months at a time but has always been based in Bristol, commuting either daily or weekly.

OTHER INFLUENCES ON SPEECH: N/A

The text used in our recordings of scripted speech can be found by clicking here.

RECORDED BY: Tshari King

DATE OF RECORDING (DD/MM/YYYY): 18/03/2020

PHONETIC TRANSCRIPTION OF SCRIPTED SPEECH: N/A

TRANSCRIBED BY: N/A

DATE OF TRANSCRIPTION (DD/MM/YYYY): N/A

ORTHOGRAPHIC TRANSCRIPTION OF UNSCRIPTED SPEECH:

When I used to travel home from work, I used to see a sign on, in Frenchay, on the side of a village hall, and it advertised salsa dancing. And for many, many years, I did think about going and never had the courage to go. And then I was talking to my friend, who used to go line dancing, and I’d been line dancing with her a few times, and she convinced me to go, just go. So I said, OK, I’ll think about it, and then I thought I’d — before I go, I’ll look and see if there is anywhere else that does it. And I went to Bath, to a party night at a place called Bonghy-Bo’s, and Mark — who takes, uh, who holds the event and he takes the classes there — taught some beginners salsa steps. And, um, so that — I started salsa on a party night: bit brave and stupid. And then I went back to Frenchay and started regular Monday classes.

So, once I’d started salsa on a Monday night, I looked elsewhere in Bristol; um, there was a place called, uh, Salsa Souls down in Bristol city centre, and that introduced me to something called bachata. So I then looked up bachata lessons, and I started taking bachata classes at Almondsbury, uh, with a lady called Jules, and three years later, she was training me to teach beginners. So I now teach beginners, which is fun. Um, I got involved with a party night, running a party night, a salsa-party night, and when they started th-the party night originally, in its – in its ten twelve years running, they used to do kizomba. And at the events down on the pier, four times a year, we had a kizomba room, so that was my introduction to kizomba; and I’ve done, I did some lessons in Torquay and a few other, uh, festivals or events. And then we decided to run a bachata-kizomba night or “bachakiz,” so we started a party night up. Unfortunately, we couldn’t attract enough people to dance both, and we had a rather large venue, so we switched to just purely kizomba, and we now run a night called Kiz Junction.

TRANSCRIBED BY: Tshari King

DATE OF TRANSCRIPTION (DD/MM/YYYY): 14/04/2020

PHONETIC TRANSCRIPTION OF UNSCRIPTED SPEECH: N/A

TRANSCRIBED BY: N/A

DATE OF TRANSCRIPTION (DD/MM/YYYY): N/A

SCHOLARLY COMMENTARY: N/A

COMMENTARY BY: N/A

DATE OF COMMENTARY (DD/MM/YYYY): N/A

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