Georgia 7

Listen to Georgia 7, a 59-year-old woman from Columbus, Georgia. She is the daughter of Georgia 8. Click or tap the triangle-shaped play button to hear the subject.

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BIOGRAPHICAL INFORMATION

AGE: 59

DATE OF BIRTH (DD/MM/YYYY): 08/03/1962

PLACE OF BIRTH: Munich, Germany, but raised in Columbus, Georgia

GENDER: female

ETHNICITY: Black

OCCUPATION: teacher

EDUCATION: master’s degree in education

AREAS OF RESIDENCE OUTSIDE REPRESENTATIVE REGION FOR LONGER THAN SIX MONTHS:

The subject lived in her birth city of Munich, Germany, for one year, and in Frankfurt, Germany, for about two years.

OTHER INFLUENCES ON SPEECH:

The speaker is part of a military family.

The text used in our recordings of scripted speech can be found by clicking here.

RECORDED BY: Jacqueline Springfield

DATE OF RECORDING (DD/MM/YYYY): 23/10/2021

PHONETIC TRANSCRIPTION OF SCRIPTED SPEECH: N/A

TRANSCRIBED BY: N/A

DATE OF TRANSCRIPTION (DD/MM/YYYY): N/A

ORTHOGRAPHIC TRANSCRIPTION OF UNSCRIPTED SPEECH:

All right, I was born in Munich, Germany; I have very little recollection of bein’ in Germany, an’ that’s not from birth — that’s from the second time that I was there livin’ in Frankfurt, Germany. Um, I do remember playin’ with my sisters outside quite a bit an’ walkin’ to school in the snow. The r- world didn’t stop like it does here when it snowed; we kep’ on goin’ to school. So, those were about the biggest memories I have of Germany.

I remember living in Columbus, not very much memory of living at Fort Benning [just southeast of Columbus]. I know I did live there, but I don’t remember Fort Benning very much, just Columbus an’ the home that I grew up in, which was in Richville Heights, and, um, we lived in a cul-de-sac. An’ I can remember playin’ outside; this cul-de-sac was at the top of a hill, an’ one of the things — ball, playin’ ball outside, always fun, unless the ball started rollin’ down that hill, somebody let it get away from ‘em. And havin’ to chase it, tryin’ to get ahead of that ball goin’ down the hill. That was always fun. Uh, but it wasn’t fun at the time; it was a fun memory now, but it wasn’t fun at the time tryna get in front of that ball.

I remember, uh, walking to the store, and so 7-11, and we w- um, my sisters and I we would walk to the 7-11, and we didn’t have any money; we got our money on the way. We would, um, find bottles that people who had threw out; and back then you could trade your bottles in for money, and you actually got enough to purchase somethin’. An’ so we would walk to the store an’, um, collect bottles along the way an’ then buy our candy an’ stuff an’ walk back home. I know my sister really love, um, Willis Plaza. We had a aunt who lived out in that area, an’ they had a little store in Willis Plaza, an’ you could go there an’ you get three cookies for a penny. And these cookies were about the size of your palm of your hand. An’ so she loved goin’ there getting those cookies.

TRANSCRIBED BY: Jacqueline Springfield

DATE OF TRANSCRIPTION (DD/MM/YYYY): 25/10/2021

PHONETIC TRANSCRIPTION OF UNSCRIPTED SPEECH: N/A

TRANSCRIBED BY: N/A

DATE OF TRANSCRIPTION (DD/MM/YYYY): N/A

SCHOLARLY COMMENTARY:

Note the presence of the pin-pen merger in words like “get” and “then.” Also note the elimination of final “t” and “d” in words like “kept” and “and.”

Most of the speech is rhotic. There is frequent use of the alveolar nasal /n/ in place of the velar nasal /ŋ/ at the ends of words like “going,” “having,” and “trying.”

COMMENTARY BY: Jacqueline Springfield

DATE OF COMMENTARY (DD/MM/YYYY): 09/11/2021

The archive provides:

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  • In most cases, an orthographic transcription of the speakers’ unscripted speech.  In a small number of cases, you will also find a narrow phonetic transcription of the sample (see Phonetic Transcriptions for a complete list).  The recordings average four minutes in length and feature both the reading of one of two standard passages, and some unscripted speech. The two passages are Comma Gets a Cure (currently our standard passage) and The Rainbow Passage (used in our earliest recordings).

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