Honduras 1

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BIOGRAPHICAL INFORMATION

AGE: 45

DATE OF BIRTH (DD/MM/YYYY): 13/10/1973

PLACE OF BIRTH: Villanueva, Honduras

GENDER: female

ETHNICITY: Hispanic/white

OCCUPATION: freelance landscaper

EDUCATION: high school diploma, some community college

AREA(S) OF RESIDENCE OUTSIDE REPRESENTATIVE REGION FOR LONGER THAN SIX MONTHS:

At the time of this recording, the subject had been living in Victorville, California, United States, for more than 20 years.

OTHER INFLUENCES ON SPEECH:

All of her children are native-born English speakers.

The text used in our recordings of scripted speech can be found by clicking here.

RECORDED BY: Dilcia Guzman

DATE OF RECORDING (DD/MM/YYYY): 05/05/2019

PHONETIC TRANSCRIPTION OF SCRIPTED SPEECH: coming soon

TRANSCRIBED BY: Deborah Ross-Sullivan and Dilcia Guzman

DATE OF TRANSCRIPTION (DD/MM/YYYY): 14/06/2019

ORTHOGRAPHIC TRANSCRIPTION OF UNSCRIPTED SPEECH:

My childhood in Honduras: Um, it was very happy. I feel free! I, I always play in the neighborhood, have a lot of friends, ’cause I’m the younger sibling in the family, and, uh, for me, it was, um, always, uh, have a good time; that was the, the, the main thing, you know. My mom: She always stay home and take care of us. We were seven; we are seven in the family. And the relationship with, um, my other, uh, brothers and sisters: Uh, they always, uh, you know, taking care of me. And what I remember, you know: I always, you know, go to school, uh, play with friends, yeah, and, helping my mom a lot. Whatever she asked me to do, uh, I always do it; I mean, the social part, like I said, you know, uh, I have a lot of friends, uh, you know — be nice and kind with my friends; uh, we always help each other too.

My brother, my older brother: He helped me a lot, you know, to learn to stuff like biking, swimming, getting into trees too, you know. We like to, to, uh, to pick fruit ’cause we have a lot of, uh, fruit trees in our house, in our backyard. We have coconuts, mangoes, plums, papayas, oranges, uh, bananas. We have a lot, a lot of things, you know, and, uh, if we want, want to eat, we just pick from the tree. My childhood was so happy, and I feel, you know, free to do stuff, you know, and to play with my, my friends.

In Honduras, um, we, we have, um, tacos. I love to eat, uh, tacos and enchiladas, but the tacos is like the flautas over here in America, but a little bit long and big, and the enchiladas is like, uh, like a tostada, you know, tostada, ground beef, um, eh, pico de gallo, and, um, how you call repollo? I don’t know, but it’s repollo. [Subject laughs.] Eh, yeah, that’s one of my, my favorite dishes when I grow up. Um, my mom like to prepare, not all the time, but, but when she prepare it, I remember it, you know, I enjoy it a lot. And another thing that, um, we, we in, when I, um, grow up, we had the, the three meals a day; it was breakfast, lunch, and dinner, but dinner — before 4 [p.m.]. It was served before 4. No food after 4 in Honduras, ’cause we went to sleep early, not too early, but, you know, yeah and yeah, that’s what I remember …

TRANSCRIBED BY: Deborah Ross-Sullivan and Dilcia Guzman

DATE OF TRANSCRIPTION (DD/MM/YYYY): 14/06/2019

PHONETIC TRANSCRIPTION OF UNSCRIPTED SPEECH: N/A

TRANSCRIBED BY: N/A

DATE OF TRANSCRIPTION (DD/MM/YYYY): N/A

SCHOLARLY COMMENTARY:

Subject switches the “cup” sound when spelled with /o/ to the “all” sound and toward the “fathers” sound when spelled with /u/. The /I/ modifies up. The r-colored vowels and diphthongs are sometimes retroflexed. At times, the soft /g/ sound reverts to /zh/, and /t/ sounds can be both dental and darkened to a /d/ sound. There is vocal musicality in the unscripted section that is missing from Comma Gets a Cure.

COMMENTARY BY: Deborah Ross-Sullivan

DATE OF COMMENTARY (DD/MM/YYYY): 14/06/2019

The archive provides:

  • Recordings of accent/dialect speakers from the region you select.
  • Text of the speakers’ biographical details.
  • Scholarly commentary and analysis in some cases.
  • In most cases, an orthographic transcription of the speakers’ unscripted speech.  In a small number of cases, you will also find a narrow phonetic transcription of the sample (see Phonetic Transcriptions for a complete list).  The recordings average four minutes in length and feature both the reading of one of two standard passages, and some unscripted speech. The two passages are Comma Gets a Cure (currently our standard passage) and The Rainbow Passage (used in our earliest recordings).

For instructional materials or coaching in the accents and dialects represented here, please go to Other Dialect Services.

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