Idaho 1

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BIOGRAPHICAL INFORMATION

AGE: 35

DATE OF BIRTH (DD/MM/YYYY): 30/08/1983

PLACE OF BIRTH: Nampa, Idaho

GENDER: male

ETHNICITY: Caucasian

OCCUPATION: rancher and graduate student

EDUCATION: third-year Ph.D student

AREAS OF RESIDENCE OUTSIDE REPRESENTATIVE REGION FOR LONGER THAN SIX MONTHS:

At the time of this recording, the speaker had lived in East Lansing, Michigan, for three academic years.

OTHER INFLUENCES ON SPEECH:

The speaker is a fifth-generation Idahoan on both sides of his family. He was raised in a rural community where many people work as ranchers.

The text used in our recordings of scripted speech can be found by clicking here.

RECORDED BY: Mia Taylor (under supervision of Deric McNish)

DATE OF RECORDING (DD/MM/YYYY): 10/04/2019

PHONETIC TRANSCRIPTION OF SCRIPTED SPEECH: N/A

TRANSCRIBED BY: N/A

DATE OF TRANSCRIPTION (DD/MM/YYYY): N/A

ORTHOGRAPHIC TRANSCRIPTION OF UNSCRIPTED SPEECH:

Yeah, so I’m from southwest Idaho. Um, it’s out in the desert there between, uh, the Owyhee Mountains and, I don’t know, the Sawtooth Mountains kinda, and then, uh, just east of the Oregon border. Um, it’s where the Boise River, the Payette River, and the Weiser River all flow into the Snake River, so it’s a big confluence of a lot of rivers coming out of those mountains, um, flowing into the Snake, which flows into the Columbia River, which goes to the ocean. … Treasure Valley in Idaho is the big valley where Boise, the capital, is housed and, uh, runs up against the, uh, basin, the Bogus Mountains, the Bogus-Basin Mountains. Um, and that’s on the eastern side, and it about a 50-mile-long valley, and we’re on the other side. Used to be very rural, and it’s still fairly rural. And, um, Caldwell’s pretty rural, and so it goes from east to west: It’s Boise, Meridian, Nampa, Caldwell, Parma in the valley, and there’s a few other cities around there, but, um, now Boise’s the number-one-growing city in the U.S., and it’s, uh, putting a lot of pressure on the rural life over on that end of the valley. …

I can say the general umbrella is stupid, y’know, um, riding on the hoods of cars and stuff, y’know, but, um, I, I grew up trappin’, so I did a lot of trappin’ out there: fox and coyote and badger and skunk and, um, mink and, um, hunting and hiking and riding horses and playing with cows, fixing fence. Um, yeah, that’s about it, drinking. …

Yeah, I’m from a ranch family, so, um, we run cattle, beef cattle, black angus, and Herefords. Um, we have in family history have had large BLM (Bureau of Land Management) allotments. Um, at one point it was about 35,000 acres, uh, through family divisions and oldest sons and youngest sons taking certain pieces and all that; now the family has deeded property about 640 acres. Um, deeded means we own it; we don’t run cattle on public land anymore. Um, growin’ up, we would run herd of about 300 head with a cow-calf operation and hay and then, uh, now all the kids have gone off and done something else. My grandpa still works the ranch, but we just lease out the land to other people to, uh, run their cattle on it, and we’ll see what ends up when he dies. We’ll see what we do with the ranch, so …

TRANSCRIBED BY: Mia Taylor (under supervision of Deric McNish)

DATE OF TRANSCRIPTION (DD/MM/YYYY): 24/04/2019

PHONETIC TRANSCRIPTION OF UNSCRIPTED SPEECH: N/A

TRANSCRIBED BY: N/A

DATE OF TRANSCRIPTION (DD/MM/YYYY): N/A

SCHOLARLY COMMENTARY: N/A

COMMENTARY BY: N/A

DATE OF COMMENTARY (DD/MM/YYYY): N/A

The archive provides:

  • Recordings of accent/dialect speakers from the region you select.
  • Text of the speakers’ biographical details.
  • Scholarly commentary and analysis in some cases.
  • In most cases, an orthographic transcription of the speakers’ unscripted speech.  In a small number of cases, you will also find a narrow phonetic transcription of the sample (see Phonetic Transcriptions for a complete list).  The recordings average four minutes in length and feature both the reading of one of two standard passages, and some unscripted speech. The two passages are Comma Gets a Cure (currently our standard passage) and The Rainbow Passage (used in our earliest recordings).

For instructional materials or coaching in the accents and dialects represented here, please go to Other Dialect Services.