Illinois 19

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BIOGRAPHICAL INFORMATION

AGE: 22

DATE OF BIRTH (DD/MM/YYYY): 21/03/1996

PLACE OF BIRTH: Palos Park, Illinois

GENDER: female

ETHNICITY: Caucasian with Irish ancestry

OCCUPATION: student

EDUCATION: bachelor’s degree

AREAS OF RESIDENCE OUTSIDE REPRESENTATIVE REGION FOR LONGER THAN SIX MONTHS:

The speaker lived in East Lansing, Michigan, for four academic years.

OTHER INFLUENCES ON SPEECH: N/A

The text used in our recordings of scripted speech can be found by clicking here.

RECORDED BY: Rachel Beck (under supervision of Deric McNish)

DATE OF RECORDING (DD/MM/YYYY): 27/03/2018

PHONETIC TRANSCRIPTION OF SCRIPTED SPEECH: N/A

TRANSCRIBED BY: N/A

DATE OF TRANSCRIPTION (DD/MM/YYYY): N/A

ORTHOGRAPHIC TRANSCRIPTION OF UNSCRIPTED SPEECH:

Uh, I have a mom, a dad, um, a beloved cat named Mew Mew. Um, I have two older brothers: Seamus — he just got married — and Danny. Um, yes, so, they’re both, like, one to two or three years older than me, and we all look alike [laughter], and I miss them [laughter]. I have two grandparents left: Grandma Birdie; her name is, um, Bertha, but everyone calls her Birdie, and Daniel. So, my grandpa’s name is Daniel, my dad’s name is Daniel, and then my brother’s name is Daniel, but we just call him Danny. Um, they’re very old; they’re, like, 85, 86. Um, my grandma is the type of grandma to just, you know, brag about her grandchildren. She, um, really likes to, um — what’s that called when you go to the boat and you bet money? She likes to, um — I forget what that word is called. You know, like, you go to the boat, you play the machines, like a casino. What’s that called? You know what I — it’s, like, there’s, like, a word; I don’t know. She goes to the hair salon a lot ‘cause she gets her hairs in — her hair into, like, this big beehive nest, and she has fake nails.

Um, and my grandpa is actually from Ireland. He, um, sold — what are those called? Those really big dogs, something hound, for, um, racing hounds or whatever a long time ago, ‘cause apparently they were really popular after the war, and he sold them to get, um, a plane ticket to come to America, and he left Ireland around 18, came to America, and, um, so, he still has an Irish brogue, and it was really hard, kinda, understanding him as a child, but obviously I understand him now. He met my grandma at an Irish dance. She’s — wasn’t even Irish, but she went to the dance anyway because all her friends made her during nursing school, and that’s how they met. …

[What do you like to drink?]

I have a few: Um, I really like, um, iced chai tea lattes, caramel macchiato, and berry, berry hibiscus. I do like coffee; I’m starting to drink coffee a lot more. I drink it, like, once a day everyday now because I have to wake up early. So, um, in the mornings I teach preschool from, like, 7:45; I have to be there from 7:45 to 12 every day. So I teach 3- and 4-year-olds. …

[What do you teach them?]

[Subject laughs.] Well, right now my unit is the five senses, so we’re doing, um, a lot of different activities dealing with the five senses. Um, for example, today we had — we’re gonna have a mystery box where I’m gonna put something in the box, and they’re gonna be able to shake it, hear it, feel it, but they can’t see it, and they have to predict what it is. Um, just different activities like that, just using all their senses.

TRANSCRIBED BY: Rachel Beck (under supervision of Deric McNish)

DATE OF TRANSCRIPTION (DD/MM/YYYY): 29/03/2018

PHONETIC TRANSCRIPTION OF UNSCRIPTED SPEECH: N/A

TRANSCRIBED BY: N/A

DATE OF TRANSCRIPTION (DD/MM/YYYY): N/A

SCHOLARLY COMMENTARY: N/A

COMMENTARY BY: N/A

DATE OF COMMENTARY (DD/MM/YYYY): N/A

The archive provides:

  • Recordings of accent/dialect speakers from the region you select.
  • Text of the speakers’ biographical details.
  • Scholarly commentary and analysis in some cases.
  • In most cases, an orthographic transcription of the speakers’ unscripted speech.  In a small number of cases, you will also find a narrow phonetic transcription of the sample (see Phonetic Transcriptions for a complete list).  The recordings average four minutes in length and feature both the reading of one of two standard passages, and some unscripted speech. The two passages are Comma Gets a Cure (currently our standard passage) and The Rainbow Passage (used in our earliest recordings).

For instructional materials or coaching in the accents and dialects represented here, please go to Other Dialect Services.