Northern Ireland 8

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BIOGRAPHICAL INFORMATION

AGE: 25

DATE OF BIRTH (DD/MM/YYYY): 05/04/1994

PLACE OF BIRTH: Belfast, Northern Ireland

GENDER: male

ETHNICITY: Irish/white

OCCUPATION: civil servant

EDUCATION: bachelor’s degree

AREAS OF RESIDENCE OUTSIDE REPRESENTATIVE REGION FOR LONGER THAN SIX MONTHS:

The subject has lived in Northern Ireland his entire life except for about a year in the United States. Below is a summary of where he has resided:

1. Belfast, Northern Ireland (Ardoyne), 1994-2010
2. Belfast, Northern Ireland (Harbour Area), 2010-2012
3. Derry, Northern Ireland, 2012-2014
4. Fargo, North Dakota, United States, 2014-2015
5. Derry, Northern Ireland, 2015-2016
6. Belfast, Northern Ireland (Skegoneill), 2016-present

OTHER INFLUENCES ON SPEECH:

The speaker received speech therapy as a child but doesn’t recall the specific reason.

The text used in our recordings of scripted speech can be found by clicking here.

RECORDED BY: Eloy F. Gómez Orfila

DATE OF RECORDING (DD/MM/YYYY): 30/03/2020

PHONETIC TRANSCRIPTION OF SCRIPTED SPEECH: N/A

TRANSCRIBED BY: N/A

DATE OF TRANSCRIPTION (DD/MM/YYYY): N/A

ORTHOGRAPHIC TRANSCRIPTION OF UNSCRIPTED SPEECH:

Oh, geocaching. Yes, um, yeah, we, well, again, the main person that was doing that was my mother. Um, she is the one who started doing it. I didn’t start doing it. She, she still loves it, and we’re still kind of doing it. We don’t do it as much as we used to do it years ago. Um, it’s just kind of, you think about it like any other hobby: Uh, yes, you go back into it, and then you come out of it again, just, with different commitments and stuff like that.

Um, but, yeah, geocaching: We, uh, when did we start that? It was about 2012, something like that. And the whole, the whole point of that, to explain to you again, was we found it great because it brought you to places you would never have thought of. And even if you may, you may know an area really well, other people may know bits and bob you don’t. Um, so going to somewhere you’ve never been before: It’s great because it can bring you to little monuments or whatever.

Eh, for example, my mother went to, uh, to France, uh, to Lourdes specifically, and there was a little, uh, cache hidden in a wall along a disused, uh, like an abandoned railroad, and then had this crazy mural, and the geocache was hidden inside the, the wall. She actually had to use her partial broken French to get someone to climb up and get it for her. But, uh, tha — it reminds me of the cache I did in Fargo. Um, I found it in one of the — it was like near a park of some sort, but it was in a tree. It was about seven, well, about, not even seven foot, but six foot up. Um, I was able to reach it, but the thing was it was frozen into the tree; I couldn’t grab it. And the whole point of geocaching is you find this little item – could be a magnetic item, or stuck to a railing, or it could be a little lunchbox thing hidden away – and you have to sign this log to basically say, like, “I was here; that’s my proof; I found it.” And, and then you put it on the little app or the website, recording on the log that you found it. But I couldn’t do that because it was frozen in the bloody tree. I couldn’t, I couldn’t grab it at all.

TRANSCRIBED BY: Eloy F. Gómez Orfila (under supervision of Deric McNish)

DATE OF TRANSCRIPTION (DD/MM/YYYY): 04/04/2020

PHONETIC TRANSCRIPTION OF UNSCRIPTED SPEECH: N/A

TRANSCRIBED BY: N/A

DATE OF TRANSCRIPTION (DD/MM/YYYY): N/A

SCHOLARLY COMMENTARY: N/A

COMMENTARY BY: N/A

DATE OF COMMENTARY (DD/MM/YYYY): N/A

The archive provides:

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  • Scholarly commentary and analysis in some cases.
  • In most cases, an orthographic transcription of the speakers’ unscripted speech.  In a small number of cases, you will also find a narrow phonetic transcription of the sample (see Phonetic Transcriptions for a complete list).  The recordings average four minutes in length and feature both the reading of one of two standard passages, and some unscripted speech. The two passages are Comma Gets a Cure (currently our standard passage) and The Rainbow Passage (used in our earliest recordings).

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