Washington 5

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BIOGRAPHICAL INFORMATION

AGE: 19

DATE OF BIRTH (DD/MM/YYYY): 06/11/1997

PLACE OF BIRTH: Arlington, Washington

GENDER: female

ETHNICITY: Caucasian

OCCUPATION: student

EDUCATION:

At the time of this recording, the subject was working toward her bachelor’s degree.

AREAS OF RESIDENCE OUTSIDE REPRESENTATIVE REGION FOR LONGER THAN SIX MONTHS:

She had been living in Ashland, Oregon, for a little less than two years at the time of this recording.

OTHER INFLUENCES ON SPEECH:

The subject had some singing lessons in high school.

The text used in our recordings of scripted speech can be found by clicking here.

RECORDED BY: Kris Danford

DATE OF RECORDING (DD/MM/YYYY): 29/05/2018

PHONETIC TRANSCRIPTION OF SCRIPTED SPEECH: N/A

TRANSCRIBED BY: N/A

DATE OF TRANSCRIPTION (DD/MM/YYYY): N/A

ORTHOGRAPHIC TRANSCRIPTION OF UNSCRIPTED SPEECH:

When I was 13, we had two Wire Fox Terriers named Keira and Calvin, named after Keira Knightley and Calvin from Calvin and Hobbes. And they were not the smartest dogs. Calvin used to slide into our glass door even when we put tape on it to keep him from doing that. And they would regularly eat anything that was on the floor of my childhood bedroom — so packs of gum or socks; uh, we found several of my dolls in the backyard. And, uh, once Calvin, the puppy, saw my dad burying mole poison in our yard and dug it back up and ate it and was very sick. But he survived, luckily. Um, they also loved pancakes. So we would cut up pancakes every Sunday morning and give them to them. We’d also put popcorn — pieces of popcorn — on our noses, and they would very gently come up and just kind of take it off the tip of our nose like little circus dogs. And, um, we couldn’t really train them to do anything like sit or shake hands or anything — they more just were interested in, like, popcorn and socks, and, um, getting their head trapped in bags and stuff like that. [Subject laughs.] So not the smartest dogs, but they were very sweet.

TRANSCRIBED BY: Kris Danford

DATE OF TRANSCRIPTION (DD/MM/YYYY): 30/05/2018

PHONETIC TRANSCRIPTION OF UNSCRIPTED SPEECH: N/A

TRANSCRIBED BY: N/A

DATE OF TRANSCRIPTION (DD/MM/YYYY): N/A

SCHOLARLY COMMENTARY: pending

COMMENTARY BY: Kris Danford

DATE OF COMMENTARY (DD/MM/YYYY): 30/05/2018

The archive provides:

  • Recordings of accent/dialect speakers from the region you select.
  • Text of the speakers’ biographical details.
  • Scholarly commentary and analysis in some cases.
  • In most cases, an orthographic transcription of the speakers’ unscripted speech.  In a small number of cases, you will also find a narrow phonetic transcription of the sample (see Phonetic Transcriptions for a complete list).  The recordings average four minutes in length and feature both the reading of one of two standard passages, and some unscripted speech. The two passages are Comma Gets a Cure (currently our standard passage) and The Rainbow Passage (used in our earliest recordings).

For instructional materials or coaching in the accents and dialects represented here, please go to Other Dialect Services.